Furniture News

Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2013 by Jim Norrena

The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design announced in April that Hilary Sanders and Michael Esteban, two recent Jewelry / Metal Arts alumni, both were awarded a 2013 Windgate Fellowship, bringing to five the total number to date of Windgate Fellowships awarded to CCA students since the award's inception.

The fellowship selection process presents a “rare opportunity to survey the best and brightest emerging makers in the field of craft.” It also gives these emerging artists both the validation and financial resources to pursue their dreams.

View additional works by the artists »

Posted on Monday, July 8, 2013 by Allison Byers

The cardinal rule of home buying is "location, location, location." But it can also apply to educational institutions.

"Any college or university takes much of its character from its location," says Stephen Beal, president of California College of the Arts. "An increasing part of a student's education isn't just about what's happening in the classroom, but also outside of it."

Visit source »

Posted on Thursday, July 4, 2013 by Jim Norrena

CCA's booth at Maker Faire received two Make magazine editor's choice awards

Ever since the college was founded in 1907, making art has defined what we do at California College of the Arts -- both what we create and how we create it.

Today we have a new challenge to how we create art. The Bay Area has become a vast melting pot of innovation driven by the demands of technology-reliant and design-savvy enthusiasts.

We live in the innovation corridor -- a unique stomping grounds where the doers and makers are integrating time-honored principles of craft into the ever-changing technological landscape.

Posted on Thursday, June 13, 2013 by Allison Byers

While completing her course at the California College of the Arts (her thesis was exploring ''sensuality and sexuality in and around furniture'') and haunting San Francisco flea markets she found two ornate but rather knocked-about Victorian chairs. She set about ''regenerating'' and ''rejuvenating'' them.

Visit source »

Posted on Thursday, June 13, 2013 by Allison Byers

Glen Helfand is with the California College of Arts in San Francisco. He says, "There used to be a network of grants that artists could get to fund projects. I mean way back in the ancient history, galleries might have given artists stipends. Now it's a much tougher game."

Visit source »

Posted on Tuesday, June 4, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Reinventing the Chicken Coop: 14 Original Designs with Step-by-Step Building Instructions
Storey Publishing, 2013
Paperback, 192 pages, $19.95

Hey backyard chickens: meet contemporary design! Coauthors Matthew Wolpe (assistant studio manager in CCA's fabrication shop) and Kevin McElroy present 14 complete building plans for chicken coops that range from the purely functional to the outrageously fabulous.

Eleven of the 14 are by the authors, and one of the remaining three is by two CCA alumni: Yvonne Mauser (Wood/Furniture 2006) and Adam Reineck (Industrial Design 2005).

One has a water-capturing roof; one is a great homage to mid-Modern architecture; and another has a built-in composting system. Some designs are suitable for beginning builders, and some are challenging enough for experts. Step-by-step building plans are accompanied by full-color photographs and detailed construction illustrations.

Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Shawn HibmaCronan (Sculpture and Furniture 2009)

My studio is in a large, charmingly aged industrial space in an old hangar on the Alameda Naval Air Base. The building is at the end of a runway that extends south into the heart of San Francisco Bay.

The industrial capacity of the site, combined with the privacy and central view of the Bay Area, make for an incredible working environment. The material qualities and patina of the space mesh well with my work, which gets done via long days, late nights, loud music, and heavy-duty machinery.

Photography by Andria Lo

Posted on Thursday, March 21, 2013 by Allison Byers

A product is being developed out of the Forest Products Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin collaborating with artist Christine Lee and US Department of Agriculture's John F. Hunt. The product in process is a MDF alternative using no resins and a combination of biodegradable and recycled materials such as used cardboard, cow manure and sawdust.

Posted on Thursday, March 7, 2013 by Christina Linden

In the past year, Orfeo Quagliata (Wood/Furniture 1999) has designed: exterior vinyl graphics for an Aeromexico 767 airplane; sets for Mexico's massively popular annual 24-hour-long television and radio broadcast benefit Teletón; glass tiles for architectural interiors and exteriors; jewelry; window displays for Barneys New York; hotel lobbies; coffee tables; whiskey glasses; and garden features for millionaires' homes.

Quagliata was born and raised in the Bay Area; today his studio is based in Mexico City, and the world is his oyster. It is extremely unusual for a designer to operate in so many media and at so many scales of production, from a tiny piece of jewelry to an airplane exterior, but maintaining a robust and diverse practice keeps his creative energies high . . . and ensures that his design work will be in demand no matter whether the global economy is ebbing or flowing.

His schedule is typically jam-packed; when we spoke for this piece, he was getting ready to catch a plane for a new overseas commission: "I'm going to Taiwan to work on an installation on the grounds of new high-rise residential towers. The work is two reflecting pools with these big, faceted, blinged-out, illuminated glass sculptural forms. These kinds of huge commissions are always fun and overwhelming at the same time."

Posted on Monday, March 4, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Barbara Holmes, "feed/rest/nest" (2013)

The work discussed in this story is on view in the exhibition By-Product Becomes Product at Intersection for the Arts (925 Mission Street, San Francisco) through March 30, 2013. There is an artists' talk on Saturday, March 23, at 1 p.m. (free and open to the public).

We all know that formaldehyde is toxic, but you may not know that it's an essential component of the glues that bind together such commonly used construction materials as plywood and particle board.

And unlike asbestos, which becomes inhalable and therefore harmful only when disturbed, these composite wood panels actually off-gas formaldehyde all the time.

The artist Christine Lee, who has been a lecturer at CCA for the past several years, was concerned about the effects of formaldehyde gas -- not only on people dwelling in structures made of these materials, but also on the artists who use them, possibly without even knowing they are exposing themselves to harm.

Pages