Glass News

Posted on Monday, June 20, 2016 by Laura Braun

A political science major in Olympia, Wash., Kloehn moved to the Bay Area in 1994 after a few years in Amsterdam, where he had begun doing metal shop work. He attended what was then called the California College of Arts and Crafts, now just California College of the Arts, in San Francisco, in the late 1990s and graduated with distinction in glass work.

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Posted on Friday, April 1, 2016 by Laura Braun

I went to CCA (California College of the Arts) near San Francisco to focus on glass specifically. It was a small department and I loved everyone there. The school was so interdisciplinary. They let you work with all the materials and had a hot shop going 24 hours a day. You could try everything!

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Posted on Friday, March 25, 2016 by Chris Bliss

In today’s world, across every imaginable industry, there’s a growing demand for creative people. Skilled artists are needed who can bring to the table an entrepreneurial spirit, unique problem-solving skills, and a hacker/DIY mentality.

Fine arts graduates can be found at the cutting edge of creative solutions, working in industry and in the community, and founding partnerships and enterprises of their own.

Posted on Thursday, February 11, 2016 by Laura Braun

Lipofsky was among the first students to work with Harvey Littleton, the celebrated founder of the American Studio Glass movement, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Immediately upon graduation, he was hired by the University of California, Berkeley to build and direct its glass program, where he taught until 1972. Teaching full-time, he concurrrently developed the glass program at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland where he remained until 1987, when he left to work full time in his studio in Berkeley. 

Posted on Thursday, February 4, 2016 by Laura Braun

He later developed the glass program at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland -- now the California College of the Arts -- where he remained until 1987, when he left to work full time in his studio in Berkeley.

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Posted on Wednesday, February 3, 2016 by Laura Braun

Lipofsky did that in two ways: he made glass art, and he taught other people how to do it, from the very beginning. The ink was barely dry on Lipofsky’s diploma when he was hired by UC Berkeley to launch its glass program. That program didn’t last, and Lipofsky went on to launch another program at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland (now the California College of the Arts).

Posted on Thursday, January 28, 2016 by Laura Braun

Almost immediately after receiving his master’s degree in fine art in 1964, he was asked to join the decorative arts department at Berkeley and create a glassblowing program. He taught at Berkeley and in 1967 also began teaching part-time at the California College of Arts and Crafts, where he became a full-time teacher in 1972 and remained until 1987.

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Posted on Monday, January 4, 2016 by Laura Braun

Aronzon has been blowing glass for more than 25 years. Born and raised in Los Angeles, she got her MFA from the California College of the Arts in Oakland, where she met titans in the field including Dale Chihuly, arguably the most famous glass blower in the world, and William Morris, one of the more innovative American glass blowers of the last 30 years. Her main influence, however, isn’t other glassmakers, she says: It’s the world around her.

Posted on Thursday, December 3, 2015 by Laura Braun

Following Christmas Vacation, Latzen's acting career all but ended with final roles in a short film, a TV episode of ABC Afterschool Special, and an appearance in 1997's Boys Life 2. Now a self-described "creative soul with an entrepreneurial spirit and a tireless work ethic," Latzen attended the California College of the Arts and spent years in sales.

Posted on Monday, October 19, 2015 by Laura Braun

This summer, the median rent for a one-bedroom in San Francisco’s cityscape of peaked Victorians soared higher than Manhattan’s, sent skyward by a housing shortage fueled in part by the arrival of droves of newcomers here to mine tech gold.

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