Graphic Design News

Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2015 by Laura Braun

I consider myself truly blessed to do what I love everyday. Coming from a long line of entrepreneurs in my family, I always knew I wanted to own my own creative business. However, like many things in life, it took a few detours before MAIKA was born. A business degree from Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley, followed by a stint in banking and a serendipitous series of events, resulted in acceptance at the design program at the California College of the Arts.

Posted on Friday, February 6, 2015 by Jim Norrena

CCA's Oakland campus

Editor's note: CCA Graphic Design associate professor David Asari met with Art.College.Life blogger Elaine Pelz, who highlighted the benefits of a CCA education at artcollegelife.com.
 

Posted on Thursday, January 15, 2015 by Laura Braun

After graduation, I decamped to the West Coast without any real plan other than I wanted to live in a place that had more sunshine. For a year or so, I worked odd jobs (including checking bags at Rasputin’s Records in Berkeley) and during that period I saw an exhibition at the SFMOMA about four Bay Area graphic designers: MIchael Vanderbyl, Michael Cronan, MIchael Manwaring and Gerald Reis. That work—energetic, colorful, witty, multidisciplinary—made a big impression on me.

Posted on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 by Laura Braun

The tear sheet section of Coronado, California-based Dana Neibert's website has the imprint of the quintessential commercial pro. What separates him from many of his globe-trotting, camera-toting colleagues is the variety of images he creates for an unusually diverse range of clients from American Airlines, American Express and AT&T to the United States Postal Service, the United States Tennis Association and United Way, with banks, drug companies, and automotive and food manufacturers in between.

Posted on Tuesday, December 9, 2014 by Jim Norrena

On November 11, CCA’s Graphic Design Program resurrected the long-dormant Concept Lecture Series, bringing in four esteemed speakers from different parts of the country and graphic design world.

The efforts were spearheaded by Graphic Design faculty member Eric Heiman and the CCA Graphic Design student group.

The lectures ran all day on the San Francisco campus and concluded with a reception in the Campus Center Student Gallery, where the WTF2 exhibition was taking place (the exhibition featured Graphic Design student work made outside of class).

See images from the Concept Lecture Series reception »

Posted on Friday, December 5, 2014 by Jim Norrena

The Center for Art & Public Life (The Center) and the MBA in Design Strategy program, both at California College of the Arts, last month co-organized TechRaking 7, an annual hackathon series put on by The Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR), which focused on the intersection of journalism and design.

TechRaking 7, the first within the series to work exclusively with college students (and CCA as its official partner), had CIR CEO Joaquín Alvarado reaching out to CCA to pose the question: How can we rethink human interaction around the news within our communities?

CIR enlisted colleagues from two of its local media partners -- Bruce Koon of KQED and Martin Reynolds of the Bay Area News Group (BANG) -- to challenge CCA students with some of their toughest community-engagement issues. For example, how might:

CIR create new ways for people to communicate about the role of guns in their neighborhoods?
BANG offer a more participatory model that empowers residents to share overlooked topics?
KQED develop cross-regional tools to communicate better the personal effects of the growing technology industry?

Far be it for anyone at CCA to turn away a challenge, thought leaders at The Center decided to enlist the help of CCA students -- working in small teams representing a wide range of disciplines -- to collectively come up with innovative solutions that could encourage greater public participation in today's changing news gathering and distribution policies and procedures.

In short, TechRaking 7 challenged students to give the concept of the traditional newsstand a much-needed facelift.

Posted on Friday, October 31, 2014 by Laura Braun

Twenty-five years ago, you might've mined the halls of the Rhode Island School of Design or the cubicles at big, traditional design agencies. Today, with designers employed across the working world, from tech startups to banks, the smartest employers are casting a wide net. Design schools aren't a bad place to look. But they're just a start. 

Visit source »

Posted on Friday, October 10, 2014 by Kari Marboe

True collaborations come easily, especially when they combine history and clay.

Ceramics faculty member Kari Marboe, Director of Alumni Relations Jessica Russell, Director of Libraries Annemarie Haar, and CCA alumnae Eve Steccati-Tanovitz (Graphic Design 1969) and Arlene Streich (Arts Education 1961; Painting 1966) worked together to reveal the history of the college’s archived woodblocks and incorporate these historical tools at the Ceramic Program’s Open House, which took place as part of CCA’s Alumni Weekend earlier this month.

See more images of the Ceramics Open House »

Story of the Woodblocks

In the late 1960s, Professor Emeritus Vincent Perez was teaching woodblock printing and drawing at what was then CCAC. An Alumni Office staff member in Treadwell Hall (now Macky Hall) asked Perez if he would like to take possession of the woodblocks.

The woodblocks had been previously used to print the college’s publications (course catalogs, newsletters, and diplomas) going back to its founding in 1907 and decades thereafter.

If Perez hadn’t wanted them, they would have been thrown away.

Posted on Monday, September 29, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Gaby Brink (BFA Graphic Design 1995) and her wife and business partner, Nathalie Destandau, started Tomorrow Partners in 2007 in West Berkeley.

Brink’s vision to partner her expertise in design with companies and organizations that are seeking sustainable solutions for projects that will benefit communities, locally or globally, has come to fruition.

* * * * *

I knew from a very early age that I was a creative person. There were no artists in my family; my father was a pilot and all of our family was in the airline industry. I didn’t think that art could be a career, but my parents were really supportive.

When in Doubt, Go to CCA

I decided to leave Switzerland and go to the U.S. to learn English and spend a year at an art school. I liked the CCA catalogue best. I moved to Oakland in 1988, and within my first year I discovered photography and decided to stay.

I experimented a lot (this was predigital) and became good at the craft of studio work. Four teachers still stand out for me: Larry Sultan was a big influence -- a great mentor and a really inspiring person!

Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 by Jim Norrena

Turner Duckworth is an award-winning visual identity and packaging design agency

"The time I spent at Turner Duckworth as a junior designer has been brief, but full of valuable lessons," recalls Graphic Design student Suwanna Ruayrinsaowarot. "The experience has been enriching and insightful in many different aspect of life."

Inside Scoop

Ruayrinsaowarot gained useful experience in her role as a junior designer at the award-winning visual identity and packaging design agency's San Francisco studio. She worked within a team of creatives, which allowed her to achieve various hands-on experiences from creating professional mockups to packaging designs.

"The company culture at Turner Duckworth is a strong, unique, and friendly one. It offers a book club, Tuesday jogging sessions, and staff birthday celebrations. The staff is friendly, funny --  most members are in their mid-20s and mid-30s. Yet they are experienced and professional."

She adds: "They have all been a great source of inspiration for me. I am motivated to discover what I want to do in this field in the future."

Pages