Graphic Design News

Posted on Wednesday, June 5, 2013 by Allison Byers

For most design school graduates, it’s a dream come true to produce work that is seen by millions. For Zach Gibson (MFA Design 2011) and Jefferson Cheng (Graphic Design 2005), it’s an everyday reality working in the art department at Google.

Posted on Tuesday, June 4, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Imagination Illustrated: The Jim Henson Journal
Chronicle Books, 2012
Hardcover, 192 pages, $29.95

Michael Morris (Graphic Design 2004) designed this adaptation of the diary that Jim Henson faithfully kept throughout his career. The diary is supplemented with a trove of little-seen visual material, including rare sketches, personal and production photographs, storyboards, doodles, and much more. Throughout, archivist Karen Falk delves into the behind-the-scenes details of Henson's life and artistic process.

Posted on Tuesday, June 4, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Power to the People: The Graphic Design of the Radical Press and the Rise of the Counter-Culture, 1964-1974
University of Chicago Press, 2013
Hardcover, 264 pages, $45

Though we think of the 1960s and the early '70s as a time of radical social, cultural, and political upheaval, we tend to picture the action as happening on campuses and in the streets. Yet the rise of the underground newspaper was equally daring and original. Thanks to advances in cheap offset printing, groups involved in antiwar, civil rights, and other social liberation issues began to spread their messages through provocatively designed newspapers and broadsheets. This vibrant new media was essential to the counterculture revolution as a whole, helping to motivate the masses and proliferate ideas.

This book is assembled by the renowned graphic designer and CCA Design faculty member Geoff Kaplan of General Working Group. It presents more than 700 full-color images and excerpts from these publications, many of which have not been seen since they were first published almost 50 years ago.

Posted on Tuesday, June 4, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

When Attitudes Became Form Become Attitudes
CCA Wattis Institute, 2013
Office Binder, 278 pages, $40/$75 (regular/special edition)

The CCA Wattis Institute's fall 2012 show, curated by Jens Hoffmann, was a sequel to the legendary 1969 exhibition When Attitudes Become Form curated by Harald Szeemann for the Kunsthalle Bern, Switzerland. This catalogue, designed by Graphic Design faculty Jon Sueda of Stripe/SF, follows the "office binder" format of the original catalogue, and also features works that are interventions directly into the book. The special edition includes a set of three posters by the Brazilian artist Alexandre da Cunha, and the regular edition has one of the three posters.

Posted on Tuesday, June 4, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Real to Real: Photographs from the Traina Collection
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, 2012
Paperback, 136 pages, $45

Bob Aufuldish (Graphic Design faculty) designed this exhibition catalogue for the de Young's Real to Real exhibition. The featured work, organized thematically, ranges from rare black-and-white photographs by Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Lee Friedlander, Diane Arbus, and Garry Winogrand to luscious, eye-popping work in color by William Eggleston, Andreas Gursky, and Stephen Shore.

Celebrating photography's fundamental fluidity and diversity through roughly 100 works, authors Kevin Moore (who served as an adviser to Trevor Traina in shaping his collection) and Julian Cox (founding curator of photography and chief curator at the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco) explore the collection's range from early documentary to more recent conceptual art. Real to Real examines the preoccupation in pictures with everyday "reality," excess, spectacle, and loss.

Posted on Thursday, May 16, 2013 by Rachel Walther

Type design is a bit like the music business: There are a few rock stars whose names everyone knows, but there are also a whole bunch of other people you haven't heard of, out there making a living doing what they love.

And CCA is proud to claim many men and women in both categories. Over the years the college has accumulated a real wealth of faculty, students, and alumni who embrace the label "type designer" and have had their letterforms used in some impressively high-profile venues. The college's emphasis on this subfield of graphic design sets it apart from other schools; the Graphic Design Program has maintained a series of courses exclusively devoted to it for more than 20 years now.

And the Bay Area, largely thanks to CCA and its ripple effects, is today a real hotbed of people who are active in the field.

Posted on Thursday, April 4, 2013 by Matthew Harrison Tedford

For friends Clive Hacker (Graphic Design 2012), Trevor Hacker (Graphic Design 2008), and Harrison Pollock (Graphic Design 2010), design is about a lot more than lines, colors, and fonts.

"Or working on the computer," adds Clive, speaking specifically about the trio's band, Sunbeam Rd., which formed in 2009 during his years at CCA (and was just featured today -- April 5, 2013 -- in the San Francisco Bay Guardian).

The three friends, who all hail from Lompoc, California, definitely perceive a relationship between the graphic design process and the process of producing an album. "With both, you have think about every aspect that you're putting together," says Clive.

Trevor agrees: "There's an overarching thematic element that's happening, but you still have to design each little piece, every idea, and then put them together. All these little tiny parts become the whole."

Posted on Tuesday, March 26, 2013 by Christina Linden

Teknion NeoCon Showroom by Michael Vanderbyl, Chicago, 2012

"My high school guidance counselor told me I wasn't smart enough to be an architect," Michael Vanderbyl said, wryly, as he handed me the program produced last fall on the occasion of his induction into the Interior Design Hall of Fame. Given the multidisciplinary course of his extraordinary career, perhaps the counselor meant to say something more like, "Vanderbyl is too intelligent to be limited to just one pursuit."

The Hall of Fame award is reserved for individuals who have made a significant contribution to the prominence of the design industry. Other inductees over the years have included such legendary figures as Frank Gehry, Antonio Citterio, and Massimo and Lella Vignelli.

"It's very flattering to be counted among such company," Vanderbyl says. "I had attended the Hall of Fame event in the past -- it's held at the Waldorf-Astoria in Manhattan -- and it was fantastic to be recognized there myself."

Posted on Thursday, March 7, 2013 by Allison Byers

At a Castro church, the organizers of March4Equality stood in a circle holding hands below red mesh hearts made from contorted Hula Hoops and, in a meditative trance, vocally imagined themselves rallying for same-sex marriage amid a lively evening at Castro and Market streets.

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Posted on Monday, March 4, 2013 by Allison Byers

Erik Adigard is a trailblazing digital-media designer who first made a splash back in the early 1990s with a series of visual essays for Wired. In more recent years, his work has taken a turn away from the web to focus on installations on the border of art and design.

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