Illustration News

Posted on Monday, October 26, 2015 by Laura Braun

The late singer is the subject of two exhbitions currently at the CJM.

San Francisco’s Contemporary Jewish Museum (CJM) has a slogan that reads: “Connecting art, people, and ideas." So when the museum launched its two new Amy Winehouse exhibitions -- Amy Winehouse: A Family Portrait and its corresponding exhibition You Know I’m No Good -- assistant curator Pierre-François Galpin (MA Curatorial Practice 2014) jumped at the chance to do just that.

“I’ve always been an Amy Winehouse fan, and I was looking to work around pop culture -- not just art -- so I was really glad and excited when this opportunity came up,” says Galpin.

Best known for her 2006 hit song “Rehab,” Winehouse passed away in 2011 at just 27 years old from alcohol poisoning after a long and public battle with substance abuse.

Both exhibitions opened July 23 at CJM, mere weeks after the release of Amy, a critically praised documentary about the singer. With the spotlight back on Winehouse, the museum sought to help fans and spectators see past the fame and tabloid fodder and present her life in a more intimate and previously unseen way.

For the stateside debut of A Family Portrait, Galpin worked closely with the curators of the Jewish Museum London, where the show originally opened under the careful supervision of Winehouse’s brother, Alex.

Posted on Thursday, August 20, 2015 by Chris Bliss

CCA students pose in front of new mural with faculty member Eduardo Pineda

A stunning new mural was unveiled this month on the Oakland campus of California College of the Arts (CCA).

Six CCA students were selected this summer to paint a new mural on the side of Martinez Hall. Led by faculty member and noted muralist Eduardo Piñeda, the team set out to create a mural that would celebrate and promote diversity and social justice, two core values of the college.

Read more about CCA's core values »

Queen Califia Rules!

The central focus of the colorful mural is Califia, a mythical warrior queen who ruled over a kingdom of black women living on the "island" of California. Her representation here was inspired by depictions of the story of Our Lady of Guadalupe and Juan Diego, the 16th century Mexican peasant to whom the Virgin Mary was said to have appeared.

In the CCA mural Queen Califia represents the people, culture, and land of California, and she is surrounded by a landscape that is both natural and political.

Juan Diego, depicted as a black youth wearing a hoodie, offers Queen Califia light, water, and corn. Diego represents the long struggle for freedom and equality, while Queen Califia symbolizes an untamed and bountiful land prior to the arrival of Europeans to the Americas.

Posted on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 by Laura Braun

(l-r) CCA alumni Shannon Shaw, Cody Blanchard, and Ian Amberson

“They’re one of my favorites,” exclaimed filmmaker John Waters as he introduced the band Shannon and the Clams at the sold-out Burger Boogaloo music festival in Oakland on the fourth of July.

See images of John Waters at CCA »

The moment was just the latest career highlight for the Oakland-based trio, who met and formed while attending California College of the Arts.

Posted on Monday, June 22, 2015 by Jim Norrena

Illustration faculty member Robert Hunt in his studio

It’s been described as the “Oscar Award of the illustration world,” and this year CCA Illustration faculty member Robert Hunt has the distinguished honor of calling his own the 2015 Society of Illustrators' Hamilton King Award.

Posted on Monday, May 4, 2015 by Laura Kenney

Ming & Khen Soh pose with Ming's 32-pound king salmon

The following exchange between Wai Khen Soh and Wai Ming Soh -- twin brothers and each an Illustration major -- appears in the spring 2015 edition of Glance, the college magazine, as part of the How We Got Here series.


Ming: I started thinking about my next course of action in life while I was serving my mandatory service in the Singapore Armed Forces. I had taken a diploma in digital media design in a polytechnic (which is like American community college) prior to my enlistment.

I asked myself: Shall I embark on work, or further my studies? Whatever path I pursued, I wanted to do the same thing as my twin brother, Khen, as it would be cool to see a pair of twins in the same profession.

Khen: It’s nice seeing brothers face tribulations side by side, especially when they have the same faces! Like most twins, we are always tearing at each other’s throats, only to give the other a friendly pat on the back when the going gets tough.

Also like most twins, we have similar interests. Drawing and creating stories are passions going way back to our childhood. It helped that our parents were encouraging.

I went to a polytechnic, too, and took a diploma in graphic design, and while the education was invaluable, I felt more interested in drawing and painting narratives. So we decided to take an undergraduate program in illustration together.

Posted on Monday, December 8, 2014 by Laura Braun

It’s been 10 years since the stroke that changed his life, and he is no longer in a wheelchair, but walking (albeit with a limp). Art has always been his way of expression and it’s carried him through. He graduated with his BFA in Illustration from the California College of the Arts this year, a couple of months before Mike Brown was shot and killed in the streets of Ferguson.

Visit source »

Posted on Monday, November 3, 2014 by Laura Braun

After she graduated, she headed to the California College of the Arts to study illustration and ceramics. In 1990, she returned to Hong Kong to teach at the Museum of Art and the Art School. "I was one of the few people bringing back the American perspective to Hong Kong, [things such as] ceramics with a sculptural edge," she reminisces. "I was trained in the West Coast Bay, where everything was possible."

Visit source »

Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Emily’s Blue Period
Roaring Brook Press, 2014
Hardcover, 56 pages, $17.99

Illustration faculty member Lisa Brown illustrated this book about a young girl who loves Picasso and uses her own art to come to terms with her parents’ divorce. School Library Journal says: “The pencil and watercolor illustrations are appropriately muted, sticking to a soft blue, green, and brown color scheme with highlights of yellow and red. The subtle addition of some digital imagery creates lively, relatable illustrations.”

Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

29 Myths on the Swinster Pharmacy
McSweeney’s McMullens, 2014
Hardcover, 32 pages, $14.95

Illustration faculty member Lisa Brown illustrated and designed this picture book that collects 29 “myths” about a small-town pharmacy, delivered by a young pair of siblings who are obsessed with this mysterious establishment. Booklist says: “Brown paints the pharmacy a drab gray that permeates the rest of the story like a dense fog, and her children, dressed in yellow, orange, and red, stand out against the inky obscurity like the incisive investigators they are.”

Posted on Thursday, May 22, 2014 by Laura Braun

Lis Kula aka Alek Morawski is a Bay Area native creating fantastically whimsical illustrations. SInce graduating California College of the Arts he now lives in Poland, focusing mostly on illustration and mural paintings he is inspired by Eastern European cartoons he used to watch as a kid. Painting imaginary worlds and translating dreams to painted pictures he entertains with eccentrically quirky figures throughout his portfolio.