Individualized Major News

Posted on Thursday, May 1, 2014 by Laura Braun

I fell in love with indigo while I was a student at California College of the Arts. Indigo is a really magical natural dye because it requires a constant relationship of care-taking. The vat must be checked on daily in order to maintain it's delicate anaerobic balance- but what is amazing is that it can be kept "alive" indefinitely. For me, Indigo became a studio companion that kept me enchanted and curious about everything that it could offer. Right now I am obsessed with batik (a hot-wax resist method).

Posted on Monday, October 28, 2013 by Jim Norrena

Three members of the CCA community have been awarded the 2012 SECA Art Award (Society for the Encouragement of Contemporary Art), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's biennial award program honoring Bay Area artists:

Zarouhie Abdalian (MFA 2010); Oakland-based New Orleans native and installation artist

Josh Faught, Textiles, MFA faculty; St. Louis-born, San Francisco-based textile artist

Jonn Herschend, former faculty member and visiting artist; Missouri native and video artist

Considering the fact only four artists (of 250 recommended by Bay Area curators, gallerists, professors, previous winners, and SECA members) are selected to receive the SECA Art Award, it's fair to say CCA artists dominated the awards -- including the fact the exhibition was co-curated by alumna Tanya Zimbardo (Curatorial Practice 2005), the assistant curator of media arts at SFMOMA.

Posted on Thursday, July 4, 2013 by Jim Norrena

CCA's booth at Maker Faire received two Make magazine editor's choice awards

Ever since the college was founded in 1907, making art has defined what we do at California College of the Arts -- both what we create and how we create it.

Today we have a new challenge to how we create art. The Bay Area has become a vast melting pot of innovation driven by the demands of technology-reliant and design-savvy enthusiasts.

We live in the innovation corridor -- a unique stomping grounds where the doers and makers are integrating time-honored principles of craft into the ever-changing technological landscape.

Posted on Tuesday, June 4, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Western Roads
Grind Show Editions, 2013
Paperback, 172 pages, $14

Western Roads is a semiautobiographical tale of wanderlust, friendship, and murder by CCA alumnus Michael Walsh (Individualized Major 1995). The story follows Walsh and his confederate, Othello Bolen, who flee Minneapolis after an incident in St. Paul. They meet a few years later in California and boil toward the climactic finish. The work is experimental and urgent, like a bebop jazz solo. It depicts the multifarious characters Walsh meets while rambling, his hatred of institutions and societal control, his struggle with depression, and, above all, his insatiable desire to "see what's out there, "to move," whether it be by hitchhiking, train hopping, or driving a dilapidated Mustang. "The tar roll was my sanctuaire. My Muse. My mentor. Passage to the bright midnight's pageant of actors, scenes -- and I got to play a part."

Posted on Monday, April 22, 2013 by Brenda Tucker

Chris Sollars, SUV Rub, 2008

Chris Sollars, adjunct professor in the First Year Program and the Individualized Major Program at California College of the Arts, is the recipient of a prestigious 2013 Guggenheim Fellowship.

Posted on Wednesday, February 6, 2013 by Jim Norrena

Peter St. Lawrence is a codirector of Oakland's FM gallery

CCA alumnus Peter St. Lawrence (BFA Ceramics 2001) is an East Bay-based artist, designer, and entrepreneur who has been an active member of Oakland’s lively arts community for more than a decade.

The 35-year-old artist is adept at experimenting with new concepts, collaborating with artists, transitioning his career path, and reinventing himself as needed. In short, he's an entrepreneur who is making his career happen, rather than waiting for it to happen.

Posted on Friday, January 11, 2013 by Jim Norrena

It's been 100 years since instructor Harry Dixon taught the first jewelry and metal arts course at what was then called California School of Arts and Crafts in 1912. One hundred years later, the Jewelry / Metal Arts Program, housed on the historic Oakland campus of California College of the Arts, is one of the oldest and most recognized in the field.

Posted on Thursday, November 15, 2012 by Allison Byers

A queer Oakland woman has won the grand prize in an artistic competition and is looking forward to a residency program in New York next year.

Amaryllis DeJesus Moleski, a self-identified racially mixed, artistically inclined, lover-of-all-things-nerdy, queer femme woman of color, is being celebrated for all the identities she embodies and expresses through her dynamic and spirited artwork.

Visit source »

Posted on Tuesday, August 14, 2012 by Jim Norrena

Kaii Tu's innovative design process has him in the spotlight. (Photo: Clint Bowers, Interiors & Sources)View slideshow 

Windgate Fellow

To say CCA alumnus Kaii Tu (BFA Individualized Major 2012) is on the right path toward career success is probably the understatement of the year. That's because Tu, who graduated with high distinction, was recently awarded a 2012 Windgate Fellowship by UNC Asheville’s Center for Craft, Creativity and Design (CCCD).

Read about the 2012 Wingate Fellows »

The $15,000 fellowship, for which more than 120 universities across the United States nominate two graduating seniors with exemplary skill in craft, is one of the largest awards in art and design in the nation.

Tu graduated from Harvard University summa cum laude with a degree in Visual and Environmental Studies, but he's also one of the youngest persons to reach the level of brand manager at Procter & Gamble, his employer from 2005 to 2009 in Cincinnati, where he worked in product design, brand architecture, and business management.

Posted on Monday, July 30, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Before CSI the television show there was still the scientific investigation of crime, and before computer software there were other (albeit more cumbersome) ways of using fingerprints found at crime scenes to convict criminals.

"Many aspects of crime detection are timeless," observes Pablo "Paul" Cardoza (Art Education 1982). And he speaks with authority here. A deep interest in art and visuality, new technologies, and creative problem solving led Cardoza from art school to the Contra Costa County Sheriff's Office, where he spent several years, to his current occupation as a private investigator specializing in computer-based forensics.

From CCA to the Sheriff's Department

"I loved CCA! I got the best grades of my life there," laughs Cardoza. "Shortly after I finished in 1982, I stumbled across an ad from the Sheriff's Department to take a test in fingerprint IDs. It was essentially evaluating our aptitude for pattern matching and negative-positive discernment. I scored really high, and was recruited for a job. I received training from the FBI and the California Department of Justice, and I also took some courses in crime scene analysis.”

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