Individualized Major News

Posted on Friday, January 11, 2013 by Jim Norrena

It's been 100 years since instructor Harry Dixon taught the first jewelry and metal arts course at what was then called California School of Arts and Crafts in 1912. One hundred years later, the Jewelry / Metal Arts Program, housed on the historic Oakland campus of California College of the Arts, is one of the oldest and most recognized in the field.

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Posted on Thursday, November 15, 2012 by Allison Byers

A queer Oakland woman has won the grand prize in an artistic competition and is looking forward to a residency program in New York next year.

Amaryllis DeJesus Moleski, a self-identified racially mixed, artistically inclined, lover-of-all-things-nerdy, queer femme woman of color, is being celebrated for all the identities she embodies and expresses through her dynamic and spirited artwork.

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Posted on Tuesday, August 14, 2012 by Jim Norrena

Kaii Tu's innovative design process has him in the spotlight. (Photo: Clint Bowers, Interiors & Sources)View slideshow 

Windgate Fellow

To say CCA alumnus Kaii Tu (BFA Individualized Major 2012) is on the right path toward career success is probably the understatement of the year. That's because Tu, who graduated with high distinction, was recently awarded a 2012 Windgate Fellowship by UNC Asheville’s Center for Craft, Creativity and Design (CCCD).

Read about the 2012 Wingate Fellows »

The $15,000 fellowship, for which more than 120 universities across the United States nominate two graduating seniors with exemplary skill in craft, is one of the largest awards in art and design in the nation.

Tu graduated from Harvard University summa cum laude with a degree in Visual and Environmental Studies, but he's also one of the youngest persons to reach the level of brand manager at Procter & Gamble, his employer from 2005 to 2009 in Cincinnati, where he worked in product design, brand architecture, and business management.

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Posted on Monday, July 30, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Before CSI the television show there was still the scientific investigation of crime, and before computer software there were other (albeit more cumbersome) ways of using fingerprints found at crime scenes to convict criminals.

"Many aspects of crime detection are timeless," observes Pablo "Paul" Cardoza (Art Education 1982). And he speaks with authority here. A deep interest in art and visuality, new technologies, and creative problem solving led Cardoza from art school to the Contra Costa County Sheriff's Office, where he spent several years, to his current occupation as a private investigator specializing in computer-based forensics.

From CCA to the Sheriff's Department

"I loved CCA! I got the best grades of my life there," laughs Cardoza. "Shortly after I finished in 1982, I stumbled across an ad from the Sheriff's Department to take a test in fingerprint IDs. It was essentially evaluating our aptitude for pattern matching and negative-positive discernment. I scored really high, and was recruited for a job. I received training from the FBI and the California Department of Justice, and I also took some courses in crime scene analysis.”

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Posted on Tuesday, July 24, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

From Amber Cox's documentation of San Francisco's Financial District

San Francisco and Istanbul: Both built across seven hills, on peninsulas jutting into major bodies of water, where East meets West dramatically and literally-continentally. Their respective situations along major global shipping routes means that they have always been rich in trade, rich in a cosmopolitan diversity of cultures, and rich in ideas: Just as the Bay Area has been a center of forward thinking, from the 1960s Haight-Ashbury counterculture to contemporary entrepreneurial Silicon Valley culture, Turkey -- and especially Istanbul -- is facing the future culturally and politically in its unique position at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and the Arab world.

CCA and Istanbul: East Meets West

CCA has been engaging with Istanbul in many cultural exchanges in recent years. In 2011 Jens Hoffmann, director of the CCA Wattis Institute, co-curated the 12th Istanbul Biennial, which featured numerous CCA alumni and faculty. The Vehbi Koç Foundation of Turkey recently announced its pledge to support one full-time Turkish student each year in CCA's Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice. And in spring 2012, Mariella Poli's CCA course Locality and Global Discourses facilitated an exchange between 16 students at CCA and five students at Istanbul Bilgi University.

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Posted on Tuesday, June 26, 2012 by Rachel Walther

When CCA alumni (and married couple) Kevin Krueger and Kristin Olson (both Individualized Major 2011) were looking around the Bay Area for an affordable studio the year after graduation, they found their dream space at 1158 Howard Street in San Francisco, formerly the home of leather bondage shop Stormy Leather.

There was just one problem: With its multiple ground floor rooms, basement areas, and loft, it was simply too large for their needs. "We didn't know what to do at first with that much space," remembers Krueger. But then the answer presented itself: They opened up their more-than-enough studio to a larger community of friends and colleagues. Staring in January 2012, the newly named Alter Space began hosting a series of exhibitions, workshops, and live performances.

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Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Oyster Culture
Cameron & Co, 2011
Paperback, 144 pages, $19.99

This book authored by Gwendolyn Meyer (Individualized Major 2004) and edited by Doreen Schmid (MA Visual Criticism 2005) features more than 150 photographs and evocative text describing this singular aspect of food culture. It focuses on the oyster farms of West Marin in northern California, including the Tomales Bay Oyster Company, Drake’s Bay Oyster Company, and Hog Island Oyster Company. It also includes 18 delicious oyster recipes prepared for the home cook from West Marin restaurants, chefs, and oyster farmers, including Osteria Stellina, Station House, the Marshall Store, Nick's Cove, and more. The book is about the pleasures of oysters, and the rich intersection between oyster farming and culinary culture in this unique region. Oyster farming itself is in the limelight these days, particularly in West Marin, and this book is aimed at all readers who have an interest in locally sourced food.

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Posted on Wednesday, May 16, 2012 by Rachel Walther

Andrew Georgopoulos (2nd from left) on the set of "The Artist"

"People have always told me no, and I've done it anyway."

There's nowhere that Andrew Georgopoulos (Individualized Major 2007) won't go to get his image. He's photographed a nude woman in the middle of Lombard Street and documented the day-to-day exploits of Snoop Dogg and other hip-hop legends. Recently he grabbed his first Hollywood studio experience working on a film with a serious budget and an international crew that would go on to be named best picture of 2011: a production you may have heard of, called The Artist.

"It's all about access," Georgopoulos explains, of how to get the story you want. "It's the defining factor that separates you from the next person." His introduction to hip-hop musicians and lifestyles started by answering an ad soliciting photojournalists for a neighborhood magazine in the East Bay. "My body of work grew, from the next artist to the next. I was always looking to get the next big name, and I was able to come to them with a background." Eventually he spent a full year capturing the life of Snoop Dogg. This was during his sophomore year at CCA, when he was 20 years old.

Georgopoulos's work can be in-your-face, but his technique never overshadows his subject. His most engaging photos of musicians are often candid shots of their more mundane, day-to-day moments, and his travel photography is as contemplative as it is exotic. His personal work, on the other hand, captures for posterity those larger-than-life moments you see out of the corner of your eye or in your more vivid dreams.

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Posted on Thursday, November 17, 2011 by Clay Walsh

Congratulations to this year's juried R.A.W. Video (real artists at work) contest winners! The contest, open to all current CCA students, challenged contestants to create a two-minute (maximum) high-resolution digital film (including audio) with “In and Out of the Studio" as the required theme.

The goal was to encourage students to pick up their digital camcorders and highlight their community at CCA—whether in the classroom, studio, residence hall—or away from the college altogether. And the goal was definitely met several times over!

2011 R.A.W. Video Contest Winners

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Posted on Monday, June 13, 2011 by Marion Anthonisen

Kristin Olson, "The Bellowing"

Hi all! Here on the CCA admissions blog, summertime is our special opportunity to introduce you to a few recent CCA graduates and to share stories of awesome summer internships.

Let's start with the graduates: Kevin Krueger and Kristin Olson, who each graduated in 2011 from the Individualized Major Program, moved to San Francisco to attend CCA after meeting (and getting married!) in Santa Cruz.

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