Interdisciplinary Studies News

Posted on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

Oakland, California-based animator David Lauer created “Goodbye Blue Camper” as a film thesis for The California College of the Arts. The stop-motion short features yeti hunting, human sacrifice and a fair bit of puppet-on-puppet violence. According to Lauer, the project began as way of paying tribute to an old puppet.

Visit source »

Read the rest

Posted on Wednesday, December 18, 2013 by Jim Norrena

Carol Ladewig (MFA Painting/Drawing 1991) is a Bay Area artist worth knowing. Aside from her delightful demeanor, her decades-long experience within Oakland’s art scene is formidable: artist, activist, gallerist, curator, teacher, and more.

But to know Ladewig requires us to first revisit some of Oakland's history.

Oakland's Pardee Artists

In 1932, at the southwest corner of 16th Street and San Pablo Avenue, a three-story commercial building, then known as the Wetmore Pardee Building

Read the rest

Posted on Thursday, November 14, 2013 by Allison Byers

So don't miss this Thursday's "METAMORPHOSIS," when the talented artist/designers from the California College of the Arts transform the Academy (and possibly you) into something unexpected. Explore a multitude of industrial, interaction, illustration, fashion, furniture and graphic designers from CCA as they showcase an amazing, cutting-edge array of work, highlighting new technologies and innovative ideas that explore the concept of metamorphosis.

Visit source »

Read the rest

Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2013 by Jim Norrena

The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design announced in April that Hilary Sanders and Michael Esteban, two recent Jewelry / Metal Arts alumni, both were awarded a 2013 Windgate Fellowship, bringing to five the total number to date of Windgate Fellowships awarded to CCA students since the award's inception.

The fellowship selection process presents a “rare opportunity to survey the best and brightest emerging makers in the field of craft.” It also gives these emerging artists both the validation and financial resources to pursue their dreams.

View additional works by the artists »

Read the rest

Posted on Tuesday, June 4, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Modern Print Activism in the United States
Ashgate, 2013
Hardcover, 270 pages, $99.95

Director of Humanities and Sciences Rachel Schreiber edits this book devoted to the explosion of socially and politically activist print culture that occurred in the United States at the turn of the 20th century. These essays focus on specific groups, individuals, and causes that relied on print as a vehicle for activism. They also take up the variety of print forms in which calls for activism have appeared, including fiction, editorials, letters to the editor, graphic satire, and non-periodical media such as pamphlets and calendars.

Read the rest

Posted on Thursday, May 9, 2013 by Allison Byers

Textiles instructor Sasha Duerr (center) and Local Wisdom students (photo: Jim Norrena)

This spring, CCA Fashion Design students addressed questions about garment use while participating in Local Wisdom, an ongoing international fashion research project that examines how we use, share, and engage with our clothes.

Several student projects selected as finalists will be featured in spring 2014 in a participatory symposium and exhibition in London, along with work from six other international design schools.

Read the rest

Posted on Wednesday, March 20, 2013 by Allison Byers

STEM has been a huge acronym buzz word in education in recent years, standing for the “hard science” pillars of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, but an initiative led by the Rhode Island School of Design is hoping to turn that into STEAM. Aimed at promoting the national movement of putting arts and design in the STEM education program, STEM to STEAM seems to be picking up momentum with its argument that creativity and flexible thinking are just as important to innovation as science.

Read the rest

Posted on Thursday, June 28, 2012 by Allison Byers

Plenty of museums these days have orientation videos. For the mind-bending, truth-testing exhibition “More Real? Art in the Age of Truthiness,” which opens next month at Site Santa Fe in New Mexico, Bay Area artist Jonn Herschend has, instead, created a “disorientation” video to greet visitors entering the space.

Visit source »

Read the rest

Posted on Thursday, April 19, 2012 by Mitchell Schwarzer

Mitchell Schwarzer gives his introduction at the CCA faculty retreat

On February 4, 2012, the faculty at California College of the Arts gathered at the college's San Francisco campus for a retreat focused on the state of the arts across our many disciplines. In the morning, 25 short presentations offered insights into challenges and opportunities faced by practitioners and thinkers in recent times. The word aired most frequently was crisis: the crisis of the Great Recession; the crisis of Global Climate Change; the crisis of understanding and working within a discipline in our digital age.

Watch the video of all the presentations (91 minutes), shot and edited by Yoni Klein (Photography 2012)

The economic downturn has produced an economic squeeze within most of our disciplines. Art directors, as Alexis Mahrus remarks, have diminished roles in shaping an illustration. Smaller profit margins reduce the flexibility and time given over to experimentation. Branding and celebrity worship take up a larger slice of the creative pie. Some presenters, like Sue Redding of Industrial Design, see no problem in this conflation of art and business and, furthermore, dispute the notion of a crisis. Yet many presenters feel that the economic crisis is not only real but wielding dangerously asymmetrical impacts. Demand remains strong for high-end craft goods and blue-chip fine art. Some small nonprofits are struggling to survive. To Ignacio Valero of Critical Studies, the priority given over to luxury items can be attributed to the ongoing influence of classical economic policies that privilege individual decision making over collective social and natural needs. Likewise, Sandra Vivanco of Diversity Studies notes that economic inequalities have greatly worsened over the past few years, especially in the developing world. Contemporary society is forging a timeless, spaceless way of conducting business, a race for lucrative and short-term gains that concentrates investment more than ever in the hands of a few.

Read the rest

Posted on Thursday, March 24, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

Gender and Activism in a Little Magazine
Ashgate, 2011
Hardcover, 194 pages, $104.95

Interweaving nuanced discussions of politics, visuality, and gender, Director of Humanities and Sciences Rachel Schreiber uncovers the complex ways that gender figures into the graphic satire created by artists for the New York-based socialist journal, the Masses. This exceptional magazine was published between 1911 and 1917, during an unusually radical decade in American history and featured cartoons drawn by artists of the Ashcan School and others, addressing questions of politics, gender, labor, and class. Rather than viewing art from the Masses primarily in terms of its critical social stances or aesthetic choices, however, this study uses these images to open up new ways of understanding the complexity of early-20th-century viewpoints.

Read the rest

Pages