International News

Posted on Wednesday, September 2, 2015 by Shiraz Chavan

Global outreach allows CCA to offer an arts education enriched with cultures

CCA might be closer to you than you think! CCA's Admissions Office representatives will be in the Middle East, Asia, Turkey, Canada, and Central and South America this fall.

View our travel schedule below and take this opportunity to make an appointment to have your portfolio reviewed and ask about our admissions requirements.

Contact the appropriate representative (below) to schedule a one-on-one appointment.

Note: We highly encourage you to RSVP for events as they fill up quickly.

Posted on Thursday, August 13, 2015 by Jim Norrena

Xiaoyu Weng (Curatorial Practice 2009)

Xiaoyu Weng's (Curatorial Practice 2009) recent appointment to curate two exhibitions in 2016 at the Guggenheim Museum in New York is part of the museum's Contemporary Chinese Art Initiative, which was launched in 2013.

Weng was selected as The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Associate Curator of Chinese Art along with Hou Hanru as consulting curator. Together the two will curate two exhibitions of commissioned works to advance The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation's longstanding commitment to the study and support of contemporary Chinese artists.

Read the press release »

Leigh Markopoulos, chair of CCA's MA in Curatorial Practice, expressed her delight at Weng's appointment: "Xiaoyu is the first of our students to be appointed to a position at the Guggenheim, and we couldn't be happier.

"We're thrilled that she'll be joining such a fantastic team and working on projects that draw on her experiences and interests -- this appointment is a real tribute to her as a person and a curator."

Posted on Wednesday, July 8, 2015 by Nick Janikian

The Tree of Life mural project (2015)

The Tree of Life (El Árbol de la Vida) is a six-foot-high by 30-foot-long community-based mural project made in May 2015 by currently detained* undocumented immigrant Central American youths and The School of Art and Open Studio of Perquin / Walls of Hope in El Salvador (cofounded by CCA faculty member Claudia Bernardi) and students and faculty from Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Virginia.

* The location is undisclosed to protect the unaccompanied alien children (UACs).

The mural depicts the perilous journey Central American youths face as they cross the United States / Mexico border. It also alludes to the brutality and violence that exists due to trafficking of narcotics.

Posted on Monday, May 18, 2015 by Rachel Walther

Amanda Cachia

Amanda Cachia (Visual and Critical Studies 2012) is an independent curator originally from Sydney who is currently working on her PhD at the University of California, San Diego. Her dissertation is on the intersections between contemporary art, phenomenology, and disability.

Posted on Thursday, May 7, 2015 by Jim Norrena

Friends and family encouraged to join!
Please join the CCA Pride Parade contingent Sunday, June 28, as faculty, staff, students, and alumni march in the 45th annual San Francisco Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Pride Parade, described as the "largest gathering of LGBT people and allies in the nation."
 
Equality Without Exception is the theme, and we're thrilled to represent CCA and show just how much pride the college has for its diverse community.
 
We want you and your family to join us!

Posted on Monday, May 4, 2015 by Laura Kenney

Ming & Khen Soh pose with Ming's 32-pound king salmon

The following exchange between Wai Khen Soh and Wai Ming Soh -- twin brothers and each an Illustration major -- appears in the spring 2015 edition of Glance, the college magazine, as part of the How We Got Here series.

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Ming: I started thinking about my next course of action in life while I was serving my mandatory service in the Singapore Armed Forces. I had taken a diploma in digital media design in a polytechnic (which is like American community college) prior to my enlistment.

I asked myself: Shall I embark on work, or further my studies? Whatever path I pursued, I wanted to do the same thing as my twin brother, Khen, as it would be cool to see a pair of twins in the same profession.

Khen: It’s nice seeing brothers face tribulations side by side, especially when they have the same faces! Like most twins, we are always tearing at each other’s throats, only to give the other a friendly pat on the back when the going gets tough.

Also like most twins, we have similar interests. Drawing and creating stories are passions going way back to our childhood. It helped that our parents were encouraging.

I went to a polytechnic, too, and took a diploma in graphic design, and while the education was invaluable, I felt more interested in drawing and painting narratives. So we decided to take an undergraduate program in illustration together.

Posted on Monday, February 9, 2015 by Benjamin Austin

Thor (Þorfinnur) Guðnason and Lynn Kirby

In 1985 documentary filmmaker Thor (Þorfinnur) Guðnason (BFA Film/Video 1988) was just starting his career, a journey that has led him to great success, when he graduated from CCA.

Since then he has made award-winning documentaries with worldwide distribution (National Geographic, TBS, ARTE, ZDF, NRK, TVP, Discovery Europe, etc.).

And like most young artists, Guðnason had many interests when he began his career, but it wasn’t until inspiration struck that he was able to pursue his passion in earnest.

Inspired by Filmmaking

“When I saw David Lynch's film Eraserhead, something struck a nerve in me,” says Guðnason. “I knew what I wanted to do with the rest of my life: make films and tell stories.”

This revelation brought clarity of purpose, but realizing intent is only part of the process of becoming; actualization requires sacrifice.

For Guðnason it required leaving his Icelandic home, where no film programs existed, in search of cinematic opportunities abroad.

Posted on Friday, February 6, 2015 by Jim Norrena

CCA's Oakland campus

Editor's note: CCA Graphic Design associate professor David Asari met with Art.College.Life blogger Elaine Pelz, who highlighted the benefits of a CCA education at artcollegelife.com.
 

Posted on Friday, January 16, 2015 by Jim Norrena

In 2011 students Anna Acquistapace (DMBA 2011), Olivia Nava (DMBA 2012), and Eric Persha (DMBA 2012), launched an idea inspired by the MBA in Design Strategy program's Social Ventures course (taught by faculty member Steve Diller).

The idea involves working with members of a solar-distribution company as a partner organization to offer community members in rural Tanzania connectivity services that use renewable solar energy.

(Initially the partner organization had wanted to address better solar-powered lighting solutions in Tanzania, which evolved into the more wide-serving Juabar business model.)

"Our [CCA] education helped us realize that you don’t approach innovation by answering questions, but rather you look to understand end-users’ needs.

"So we didn’t come to that project on 'how can we better sell solar lights?' but more 'how do we understand the electricity experience of Tanzanians with little or no electricity experience?'"

Posted on Monday, November 10, 2014 by Matthew Harrison Tedford

While still in high school, Claudia Alvarez (MFA 2003) began a job at the UC Davis Medical Center that would shape the rest of her professional and artistic life in unexpected ways.

Visit the artist's website »

As a patient escort, she encountered a diverse group of people, many of whom had very rare diseases and long-term illnesses. One of her first assignments, she recalls, was taking a body to the morgue.

But it was working with the living that caused Alvarez to look at life differently. “To make them laugh, for even five minutes, inspired me to think about life in different ways.”

The patients were sometimes children who seemed old as they grappled with extreme infirmity, and sometimes older people who became more like children as they aged. Alvarez’s conception of age expanded; she saw maturity in children and vulnerability in grown adults.

The first time she created a sculpture of a child with an old face, now a hallmark of her practice, “People freaked out. They asked where this eerie figure came from.”

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