International News

Posted on Monday, March 3, 2014 by Deborah Valoma

Mariano Sosa Martinez and Rafaela Ruiz Guetierrez demonstrate at the Textile Futures public demonstration at the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum. Photo by Sita Bhaumik

Textile Futures 2014

Visiting Artists Reflect Culture in Craft

 

The Textiles Program at California College of the Arts hosted two respected members of the artist collective Centro de Arte Textil Zapoteco Bii DauuMariano Sosa Martinez and Rafaela Ruiz Gutierrez, for the 2014 biennial event Textile Futures 2014: Conversations Around the Dye Pot.

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Posted on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 by Allison Byers

Team members Kristina Kotlier (MArch 2013) (left) and Raine Paulson Andrews (MArch 2014) (right) with a STAND UP supporter

In spring 2013, three CCA students came together with one common goal: to make a difference with an IMPACT Social Entrepreneurship Award from CCA’s Center for Art and Public Life.

Robert Gomez (MFA and MA Visual and Critical Studies 2013), Raine Paulson Andrews (MArch 2014), and Kristina Kotlier (MArch 2013) were indeed one of three teams who won the award for summer 2013, and the project they carried out, STAND UP with Jamaica, was a major turning point for all of them.

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Posted on Monday, February 10, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Meet ChuCha Santamaria: dancing siren, disco singer, and larger-than-life alter ego of CCA alumna Sofía Córdova (MFA 2010). Born and raised in Puerto Rico, Córdova has developed an artistic practice spanning sculpture and photography, installation, and video, but it is her music and performances as ChuCha Santamaria that have attracted the most attention.

In 2011, she and her husband, the musician and artist Matthew Kirkland, released their debut album ChuCha Santamaria Y Usted. (It was the central piece in an installation/performance cycle.) Reviewers were dazzled. “Fantastic, vital . . . imminently catchy,” wrote East Bay Express critic Ellen Cushing. “Singer/wordsmith Sofía Córdova sings in inglés, español, y Vocoder, carefully unfolding her melodies with stately restraint,” enthused PopMatters reviewer Josh Langhoff.

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Posted on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 by Jim Norrena

(l-r) Pratibha Parmar, Alice Walker, and Geena Davis [photo: Jim Norrena]

Pratibha Parmar is a British filmmaker, director, producer, and writer who is known internationally for her political and often controversial documentary film work. She’s also a stalwart activist within the global feminism and lesbian rights movements.

In short, her accomplishments and commitment to making art that matters makes her an ideal visiting artist (MFA in Film) here at California College of the Arts.

Before she was born, Parmar’s family emigrated from India to East Africa, and then later immigrated to London, where she was raised and went on to study at Bradford and Birmingham Universities where she earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees, respectively.

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Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 by Dustin N. Smith

California College of the Arts is a featured partner for the 2014 Southern Graphics Council International (SGCI) Bridges: Spanning Tradition, Innovation & Activism conference March 26-29.

Bridges will investigate the intersections between traditional and emerging technologies and how these tools are vehicles for creating meaningful and critical discourse around contemporary issues in printmaking.

The event includes dozens of Bay Area participating organizations such at Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Kala Art Institute, 826 Valencia, Berkeley Art Museum, Crown Point Press, San Francisco Center for the Book, and many others.

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Posted on Friday, January 24, 2014 by Jim Norrena

(inset l-r) Emi Watanabe, Kyaligaba Frank, and Andrew Maxwell-Parish

California College of the Arts Hybrid Lab manager Andrew Maxwell-Parish spent his holiday break far away from the college, helping a community he’d never met before. 

After crowd-sourcing funds from friends and family in order to travel to Kampala, Uganda, he and his "instructables" colleague Emi Watanabe flew half-way around the globe to meet Paola de Cecco, who is in charge of the 3D printers owned by local Kampala-based nonprofit, Village Energy. 

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Posted on Monday, January 20, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

On a crystal-clear June evening in summer 2013, the sun is setting in Marfa, Texas, and a dozen CCA students -- together with a dozen more students from two art schools in the Netherlands -- are settling into the evening rhythms of their tent city.

The tents are cozily nestled in the courtyard of a former officer’s club, long abandoned by the US military. Elsewhere in the building complex, an old bar has been converted into an ad hoc Internet lounge. A spookily empty ballroom houses a broken-down old piano. The kitchen has accommodated the making of many a communal dinner.

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Posted on Monday, December 9, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

"Japan totally blew my mind."

That's a typical comment from a student after returning from Doug Akagi's summer study-abroad trip to Japan. Akagi created the course -- titled "In Search of Emptiness and Wabi-Sabi" -- three years ago, and he has led it each summer since. It's often difficult for the students to put into words what the adventure means to them and their work.

"Most of them," Akagi observes, "have never experienced a metropolis like Tokyo or the sublime beauty of an ancient city like Kyoto. And I realize that the trip is expensive, with the tuition and the airfare and the incidentals. So I try to make it a trip of a lifetime.

"Leading 14 students to almost 30 venues in two different cities in 12 days without incident is a challenge, and exhausting. Dozens of subway, train, and bus rides, endless miles of walking, and counting heads at every juncture.”

But there is plenty of beauty and inspiration as a reward. And Akagi gets a profound kick out of showing off his old haunts from when he was a young graphic designer living and working in Tokyo and Kyoto.

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Posted on Monday, November 11, 2013 by Allison Byers

Uriarte sketching in Gharma, Iraq, in 2009View slideshow 

Maximilian Uriarte (Animation 2013) literally draws from experience to create the virally popular comic strip Terminal Lance. Started in late 2009 and based on Uriarte’s experiences as a Marine in Iraq, Terminal Lance is now published weekly in the Marine Corps Times newspaper and online.

In the Marines for “Art’s Sake”

There are many reasons men and women join the military, but Uriarte’s reasoning at age 19 was quite unique. “As an artist, I felt an intense need to experience the world in order to give a kind of legitimacy to my art. It might sound strange, but ultimately I joined for the sake of my art. I wanted to find the most difficult thing I could imagine.”

Uriarte joined in 2006, with the war in Iraq in full swing. With high scores on his ASVB entrance exam, Uriarte chose to go into the infantry. “My actual MOS ended up being 0351, Infantry Assaultman. I was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines in Hawaii, where I deployed to Iraq twice between 2007 and 2009.”

Art at War

During Uriarte’s second tour, his battalion commander saw his penchant for art and photography and offered him the opportunity to serve as combat artist and photographer. Through this, Uriarte was able to travel all over Iraq, taking photos and sketching the Marines’ daily lives.

“Most of the work I did was official, classified, documentary photojournalism. On a rare occasion, I would embed with a unit and effectively be allowed to capture anything I wanted, photographically or otherwise. This was the most fun, as I was given artistic freedom to sketch and take pictures of basically anything.

Part of my billet was also photographing for use our battalion “Cruise Book” (a yearbook for the deployment), which I designed cover to cover.

“This would ultimately prove to be an important step in my career, as it not only gave me experience I could draw from, but also laid the groundwork for Terminal Lance.”

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Posted on Monday, October 21, 2013 by Molly Mitchell

Simin Eivazi (BFA Sculpture 2013)

The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation announced in June that recent CCA alumna Simin Eivazi (BFA Sculpture 2013) was one of 20 scholars selected to receive the Graduate Arts Award for 2013.

The award provides each Jack Kent Cooke Scholar with funding up to $50,000 per year for up to three years to support graduate studies in visual arts, performance, or creative writing at accredited institutions in the United States or abroad.

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