Jewelry Metal Arts News

Posted on Monday, April 11, 2016 by Jim Norrena

On Thursday, April 7, Center for Art and Public Life (CAPL) at California College of the Arts presented the spring 2016 IMPACT Social Entrepreneurship Awards, at which three juried interdisciplinary teams each were awarded a $10,000 grant to create innovative and creative solutions to social problems by collaborating with community experts and partners.

Through such grants, the awards program enables a new generation of creative innovators to develop meaningful social change. Students are challenged to apply their critical and creative problem-solving skills to make a difference locally, nationally, and internationally by developing proposals and facilitating actionable next steps.

In the spring CAPL received an unprecedented amount of grant proposals from undergraduate and graduate students across 15 different disciplines with project sites in San Francisco, Utah, India, Pakistan, China, and Columbia.

 

Posted on Tuesday, March 29, 2016 by Laura Braun

Hailing from a family of self-starters and entrepreneurs, the support and vote of confidence that Emi Grannis received to start a business of her own — paired with her desire to make — made her road to self-employment an obvious one. But it wasn’t until she attended California College of the Arts that her medium became evident: jewelry-making and the art of metalsmithing.

Posted on Friday, March 25, 2016 by Chris Bliss

In today’s world, across every imaginable industry, there’s a growing demand for creative people. Skilled artists are needed who can bring to the table an entrepreneurial spirit, unique problem-solving skills, and a hacker/DIY mentality.

Fine arts graduates can be found at the cutting edge of creative solutions, working in industry and in the community, and founding partnerships and enterprises of their own.

Posted on Monday, November 30, 2015 by Laura Braun

"I love to be asked questions about my work and the process," Arima said. "As interim chair of the jewelry metal/arts program at California College of the Arts, I'm an educator. Direct interaction with the public has helped me understand my work and how I want to push and pull it in different directions."

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Posted on Thursday, August 20, 2015 by Chris Bliss

CCA students pose in front of new mural with faculty member Eduardo Pineda

A stunning new mural was unveiled this month on the Oakland campus of California College of the Arts (CCA).

Six CCA students were selected this summer to paint a new mural on the side of Martinez Hall. Led by faculty member and noted muralist Eduardo Pineda, the team set out to create a mural that would celebrate and promote diversity and social justice, two core values of the college.

Read more about CCA's core values »

Queen Califia Rules!

The central focus of the colorful mural is Califia, a mythical warrior queen who ruled over a kingdom of black women living on the "island" of California. Her representation here was inspired by depictions of the story of Our Lady of Guadalupe and Juan Diego, the 16th century Mexican peasant to whom the Virgin Mary was said to have appeared.

In the CCA mural Queen Califia represents the people, culture, and land of California, and she is surrounded by a landscape that is both natural and political.

Juan Diego, depicted as a black youth wearing a hoodie, offers Queen Califia light, water, and corn. Diego represents the long struggle for freedom and equality, while Queen Califia symbolizes an untamed and bountiful land prior to the arrival of Europeans to the Americas.

Posted on Tuesday, August 18, 2015 by Jim Norrena

CCA's spring School to Market course is offered as part of the interdisciplinary craft curriculum initiative and is cotaught by David Cole (Jewelry / Metal Arts Program) and Anne Wolf (Textiles Program).

Now in its fifth year, the School to Market workshop represents a partnership between CCA and the American Craft Council to help bring hands-on entrepreneurial experience to young makers working in craft media.

American Craft Council Show

Over the course of the semester, the faculty members guide students through the process of producing, displaying, and then exhibiting their their fine craft works and that of their peers at the prestigious American Craft Council Show held July 31 through August 2 at the Fort Mason Center Festival Pavilion in San Francisco.

Posted on Friday, February 20, 2015 by Em Meine

Changing Tides, Marilyn da Silva. (Courtesy of the artist)

Jewelry / Metal Arts chair Marilyn da Silva was recently selected by The Maloof Foundation and Craft in America as one of 12 "core artists" to exhibit her work and nominate other artists working in craft-based fields for California Handmade: State of the Arts

Posted on Tuesday, February 3, 2015 by Jim Norrena

Jaydan Moore, "Specimens" (2013), found materials

More than a century old, CCA's Jewelry / Metal Arts Program continues to produce award-winning fine artists, as evidenced by Jaydan Moore's (BFA 2008) recent American Craft Council (ACC) Emerging Voices Award.

This is the first ACC award to recognize emerging talent among scholars, curators, and critics. In addition to cash prizes, winners will also be promoted in the June/July issue of American Craft magazine.

Posted on Monday, December 15, 2014 by Em Meine

Metamorphosis: the Transformation of Everyday Objects is a current exhibition of Jewelry / Metal Arts alumni at the Museum of Craft and Design. The exhibition is curated by CCA faculty member David Cole and features the work of 10 California College of the Arts alumni.

About Metamorphosis

What is beautiful? How do artists see the world around us?

These artworks were selected to examine the creative process of makers who choose to use common and even humble objects as their medium. Some of these things were found in thrift stores -- or the trash -- and have an entire history of manufacture and use before they were rediscovered for another purpose.

Their relationship to some previous, unknown owner and the journey of that object into and out of the life of that person, is recorded in the patterns of wear on the surfaces.

Other materials have inherent beauty that is easy to overlook because of the context in which we perceive them. The luster and radiance that would distinguish the rarest pearl is viewed quite differently when it is seen in grains of rice or pencil leads.

Posted on Friday, November 21, 2014 by Laura Braun

You may know the 41-year-old Oakland resident from his much-lauded 2012 Smithsonian installation, En-Lightening—a room composed of handcrafted tiles, LED lights, and a single chair. The piece attempts to replicate the effects of meditation, such as tranquility and stillness, and emerged from the pressure his family put upon him to embrace their religion. Dong cites the experience of creating En-Lightening as essential to his personal growth.

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