Jewelry Metal Arts News

Posted on Thursday, August 20, 2015 by Chris Bliss

CCA students pose in front of new mural with faculty member Eduardo Pineda

A stunning new mural was unveiled this month on the Oakland campus of California College of the Arts (CCA).

Six CCA students were selected this summer to paint a new mural on the side of Martinez Hall. Led by faculty member and noted muralist Eduardo Piñeda, the team set out to create a mural that would celebrate and promote diversity and social justice, two core values of the college.

Read more about CCA's core values »

Queen Califia Rules!

The central focus of the colorful mural is Califia, a mythical warrior queen who ruled over a kingdom of black women living on the "island" of California. Her representation here was inspired by depictions of the story of Our Lady of Guadalupe and Juan Diego, the 16th century Mexican peasant to whom the Virgin Mary was said to have appeared.

In the CCA mural Queen Califia represents the people, culture, and land of California, and she is surrounded by a landscape that is both natural and political.

Juan Diego, depicted as a black youth wearing a hoodie, offers Queen Califia light, water, and corn. Diego represents the long struggle for freedom and equality, while Queen Califia symbolizes an untamed and bountiful land prior to the arrival of Europeans to the Americas.

Posted on Tuesday, August 18, 2015 by Jim Norrena

CCA's spring School to Market course is offered as part of the interdisciplinary craft curriculum initiative and is cotaught by David Cole (Jewelry / Metal Arts Program) and Anne Wolf (Textiles Program).

Now in its fifth year, the School to Market workshop represents a partnership between CCA and the American Craft Council to help bring hands-on entrepreneurial experience to young makers working in craft media.

American Craft Council Show

Over the course of the semester, the faculty members guide students through the process of producing, displaying, and then exhibiting their their fine craft works and that of their peers at the prestigious American Craft Council Show held July 31 through August 2 at the Fort Mason Center Festival Pavilion in San Francisco.

Posted on Friday, February 20, 2015 by Em Meine

Changing Tides, Marilyn da Silva. (Courtesy of the artist)

Jewelry / Metal Arts chair Marilyn da Silva was recently selected by The Maloof Foundation and Craft in America as one of 12 "core artists" to exhibit her work and nominate other artists working in craft-based fields for California Handmade: State of the Arts

Posted on Tuesday, February 3, 2015 by Jim Norrena

Jaydan Moore, "Specimens" (2013), found materials

More than a century old, CCA's Jewelry / Metal Arts Program continues to produce award-winning fine artists, as evidenced by Jaydan Moore's (BFA 2008) recent American Craft Council (ACC) Emerging Voices Award.

This is the first ACC award to recognize emerging talent among scholars, curators, and critics. In addition to cash prizes, winners will also be promoted in the June/July issue of American Craft magazine.

Posted on Monday, December 15, 2014 by Em Meine

Metamorphosis: the Transformation of Everyday Objects is a current exhibition of Jewelry / Metal Arts alumni at the Museum of Craft and Design. The exhibition is curated by CCA faculty member David Cole and features the work of 10 California College of the Arts alumni.

About Metamorphosis

What is beautiful? How do artists see the world around us?

These artworks were selected to examine the creative process of makers who choose to use common and even humble objects as their medium. Some of these things were found in thrift stores -- or the trash -- and have an entire history of manufacture and use before they were rediscovered for another purpose.

Their relationship to some previous, unknown owner and the journey of that object into and out of the life of that person, is recorded in the patterns of wear on the surfaces.

Other materials have inherent beauty that is easy to overlook because of the context in which we perceive them. The luster and radiance that would distinguish the rarest pearl is viewed quite differently when it is seen in grains of rice or pencil leads.

Posted on Friday, November 21, 2014 by Laura Braun

You may know the 41-year-old Oakland resident from his much-lauded 2012 Smithsonian installation, En-Lightening—a room composed of handcrafted tiles, LED lights, and a single chair. The piece attempts to replicate the effects of meditation, such as tranquility and stillness, and emerged from the pressure his family put upon him to embrace their religion. Dong cites the experience of creating En-Lightening as essential to his personal growth.

Posted on Monday, January 20, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

On a crystal-clear June evening in summer 2013, the sun is setting in Marfa, Texas, and a dozen CCA students -- together with a dozen more students from two art schools in the Netherlands -- are settling into the evening rhythms of their tent city.

The tents are cozily nestled in the courtyard of a former officer’s club, long abandoned by the US military. Elsewhere in the building complex, an old bar has been converted into an ad hoc Internet lounge. A spookily empty ballroom houses a broken-down old piano. The kitchen has accommodated the making of many a communal dinner.

Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2013 by Jim Norrena

The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design announced in April that Hilary Sanders and Michael Esteban, two recent Jewelry / Metal Arts alumni, both were awarded a 2013 Windgate Fellowship, bringing to five the total number to date of Windgate Fellowships awarded to CCA students since the award's inception.

The fellowship selection process presents a “rare opportunity to survey the best and brightest emerging makers in the field of craft.” It also gives these emerging artists both the validation and financial resources to pursue their dreams.

View additional works by the artists »

Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Rachel Walther

When you first enter Enlightenment Room (2008), an immersive environment artwork by Jewelry / Metal Arts faculty member Nick Dong, nothing happens. You walk down a short, mirrored corridor in semi-darkness to a gray cushioned seat that faces the entrance.

But the moment you sit down, light begins to fill the space, and thousands of white, oval tiles glisten into view. Ethereal music fills your ears. The light brightens, and the music intensifies. This experience can last a few minutes, or a few hours, depending on how long you remain seated . . . waiting. The moment you stand, the music and lights fade out.

Watch a video of Enlightenment Room

Posted on Thursday, July 18, 2013 by Matthew Harrison Tedford

This year, the San Francisco metal arts and jewelry gallery Velvet da Vinci celebrates its 23rd anniversary. Its cofounders, CCA alumnus Mike Holmes (Jewelry / Metal Arts 1984) and his business partner Elizabeth Shypertt, originally met in 1984 in a studio class at the de Young Museum. Both had had some success selling their jewelry work independently, and it seemed like a natural idea to start a gallery to capitalize on that momentum.

"We found this wonderful little storefront in Hayes Valley," Holmes remembers. "The smallest one on the sunny side of Hayes Street!" It was a fortuitous moment: just after the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake had damaged the Central Freeway there, but before the freeway had actually been torn down and rents started to rise.

(The name "Velvet da Vinci," in case you are wondering, was inspired by an old Perry Mason television episode.)