Jewelry Metal Arts News

Posted on Thursday, July 18, 2013 by Matthew Harrison Tedford

This year, the San Francisco metal arts and jewelry gallery Velvet da Vinci celebrates its 23rd anniversary. Its cofounders, CCA alumnus Mike Holmes (Jewelry / Metal Arts 1984) and his business partner Elizabeth Shypertt, originally met in 1984 in a studio class at the de Young Museum. Both had had some success selling their jewelry work independently, and it seemed like a natural idea to start a gallery to capitalize on that momentum.

"We found this wonderful little storefront in Hayes Valley," Holmes remembers. "The smallest one on the sunny side of Hayes Street!" It was a fortuitous moment: just after the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake had damaged the Central Freeway there, but before the freeway had actually been torn down and rents started to rise.

(The name "Velvet da Vinci," in case you are wondering, was inspired by an old Perry Mason television episode.)

Posted on Thursday, July 4, 2013 by Jim Norrena

CCA's booth at Maker Faire received two Make magazine editor's choice awards

Ever since the college was founded in 1907, making art has defined what we do at California College of the Arts -- both what we create and how we create it.

Today we have a new challenge to how we create art. The Bay Area has become a vast melting pot of innovation driven by the demands of technology-reliant and design-savvy enthusiasts.

We live in the innovation corridor -- a unique stomping grounds where the doers and makers are integrating time-honored principles of craft into the ever-changing technological landscape.

Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Curtis Arima (Jewelry / Metal Arts 1998, now Jewelry / Metal Arts faculty)

My studio is in the Sawtooth Building in West Berkeley. It is a historic structure, built to house the Kawneer Company factory in 1913, and then later home to the Sealy Mattress Company.

I specialize in ancient jewelry and metalworking practices that are no longer in widespread use in industry because of their time-consuming nature. I want to honor their history and continue their legacy while having a contemporary conversation.

Even though my studio is divided into a retail space and a making space, the "threshold" is transparent; the intent is for people who visit the retail space to be able to see and connect with my processes of making and understand more about what they are looking at and buying.

The studio is definitely an extension of my artistic brain. The aesthetic and functional aspects are totally intertwined. This is also exciting when clients and the public come in, as it allows them access to parts of my artistic process that they'd otherwise never see.

Photography by Andria Lo

Posted on Monday, March 4, 2013 by Allison Byers

Clients who can't see the beauty in the whimsy - or the whimsy in the beauty - of a room done in elegant furniture surrounded by quilt-like wall hangings made of stained and painted coffee filters probably aren't the best match for interior designers Andrew Fisher and Jeffry Weisman.

Visit source »

Posted on Friday, January 11, 2013 by Jim Norrena

It's been 100 years since instructor Harry Dixon taught the first jewelry and metal arts course at what was then called California School of Arts and Crafts in 1912. One hundred years later, the Jewelry / Metal Arts Program, housed on the historic Oakland campus of California College of the Arts, is one of the oldest and most recognized in the field.

Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 by Erin Wheeler

On December 15 and 16, four CCA students and one recent alumna will showcase and sell their work at the 4th Annual Renegade Craft Fair Holiday Market in San Francisco.

Inspired by the students who took part in the American Craft Council exhibition and the CCA coursework linking craft to entrepreneurship, CCA’s Career Development Office offered students a free shared booth.

Posted on Thursday, September 13, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

The Jewelry and Metalwork of Marie Zimmermann
Yale University Press, 2012
Hardcover, 400 pages, $65

David Cole (Jewelry / Metal Arts faculty) spent 13 years and traveled widely to photograph the work of Marie Zimmermann for this book, which includes approximately 400 of his images. He cleaned, documented, styled, and photographed each piece, from tiny rings to mausoleums. Zimmermann was one of the most creative and important makers of metalwork in early-20th-century America. She worked in gold, silver, bronze, copper, and iron, and explored a wide range of innovative approaches to pattern, material, and surface. She led a very colorful life as well. A true eclectic in her personal life, her professional pursuits, and her creative expression, she has proven an elusive character for historians; this book gathers her full story for the first time. Essays by leading scholars in the decorative arts offer extensive new research.

Posted on Tuesday, July 24, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

From Amber Cox's documentation of San Francisco's Financial District

San Francisco and Istanbul: Both built across seven hills, on peninsulas jutting into major bodies of water, where East meets West dramatically and literally-continentally. Their respective situations along major global shipping routes means that they have always been rich in trade, rich in a cosmopolitan diversity of cultures, and rich in ideas: Just as the Bay Area has been a center of forward thinking, from the 1960s Haight-Ashbury counterculture to contemporary entrepreneurial Silicon Valley culture, Turkey -- and especially Istanbul -- is facing the future culturally and politically in its unique position at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and the Arab world.

CCA and Istanbul: East Meets West

CCA has been engaging with Istanbul in many cultural exchanges in recent years. In 2011 Jens Hoffmann, director of the CCA Wattis Institute, co-curated the 12th Istanbul Biennial, which featured numerous CCA alumni and faculty. The Vehbi Koç Foundation of Turkey recently announced its pledge to support one full-time Turkish student each year in CCA's Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice. And in spring 2012, Mariella Poli's CCA course Locality and Global Discourses facilitated an exchange between 16 students at CCA and five students at Istanbul Bilgi University.

Posted on Thursday, June 28, 2012 by Elin Christopherson

Artist in Resident

Artist-in-resident Don Friedlich was the spring 2012 visiting artist at California College of the Arts in the Jewelry / Metal Arts and Glass Programs.

Innovative Approach

Although metal arts and glass are ancient arts, Friedlich applies new and innovative industrial technologies in his work. While at CCA Friedlich brought CNC-milled graphite molds into the Hot Shop where Glass 2 students helped him fill them with hot glass. He also brought in 3D-printed vitrious objects, which he fired enamel colors onto, and he CNC-milled a plaster blow mold using the CCA shops.

Watch a video »

Posted on Thursday, June 28, 2012 by Ace Lehner

From August 3 to 5, approximately 30 students will present their work at CCA's "School to Market" booth at the American Craft Council Show at Fort Mason Center in San Francisco.

With more than 230 of the top contemporary jewelry, clothing, furniture, and home-decor artists from across the country, this is the largest juried craft show west of the Rockies, providing an unparalleled opportunity for students to exhibit their fine art and functional craft works in a high-profile venue.

Pages