Painting Drawing News

Posted on Tuesday, March 12, 2013 by Chris Bliss

untitled # 7 (from The Linens), 2012 acrylic, graphite on polished medium-weight Belgian linen 20 x 22 in.

George Lawson Gallery in Los Angeles presents the work of CCA President Stephen Beal March 15-April 27 (the opening reception was held March 16 from 5 to 8 pm.).

The gallery will showing selections from two series by Beal -- paintings on wooden panels and stretched linen that predominately engage white. A 140-page hardcover book with 62 color reproductions accompanies the exhibition.

Posted on Monday, March 4, 2013 by Allison Byers

Two new installations by Parker Ito in his Los Angeles solo debut diagram artistic relationships, no doubt underscored by the new realities of a digital world. That is both their considerable strength and an unavoidable weakness.

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Posted on Monday, March 4, 2013 by Allison Byers

Clients who can't see the beauty in the whimsy - or the whimsy in the beauty - of a room done in elegant furniture surrounded by quilt-like wall hangings made of stained and painted coffee filters probably aren't the best match for interior designers Andrew Fisher and Jeffry Weisman.

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Posted on Monday, March 4, 2013 by Allison Byers

CCA Faculty members Kim Anno and Tirza True Latimer took part in the Feminist Art Project panel discussions at the Brooklyn Museum, part of the annual College Art Association conference.

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Posted on Friday, February 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

In summer 2012, the artwork of alumna Mia Christopher (Painting/Drawing 2012) was exhibited in a high-profile shop window on Market Street . . . but not in its original form. As part of a collaboration with the major clothing brand Anthropologie, Christopher’s two-dimensional paintings had been transformed into prints on dresses, blouses, and jumpers.

Posted on Tuesday, December 18, 2012 by Allison Byers

Toyin Odutola, Artist, 27
Using ballpoint pens and other drawing utensils, Nigerian-born Odutola makes intricate portraits from photographs. She has had a one-woman show at the Jack Shainman gallery in New York City, and exhibited in group shows at the Menil Collection in Houston and at the Studio Museum in Harlem.

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Posted on Friday, November 16, 2012 by Rachel Walther

Glen Helfand (in the green T-shirt) with CCA students and Creativity Explored artists

A hall of mirrors reflecting an artist's actual view of the world; sculptural train tracks coming out of the wall and into the gallery space; colorful, hanging text-mobiles that evoke psychologically charged word-clouds; a fashion magazine devoted to one fabulous model; and a pop-up shop selling equestrian-themed T-shirts, jewelry, and drawings:

These are the works that will be on view in Fabricators, the culminating exhibition for Glen Helfand's fall 2012 ENGAGE at CCA course, at Jack Fischer Gallery in San Francisco, December 12-22, 2012. The public is invited to the reception on Saturday, December 15, 3-5 p.m.

Posted on Monday, October 1, 2012 by Allison Byers

Serena Cole was born to Californian suburban parents who lost their love for each other as soon as the pool was built on the honeymoon home. Afterward, her mother married a man because he looked like Tom Selleck, who lived on the top of mountain. Forced to leave the roller-skatable sidewalks of San Jose, at age nine she found herself living off-the-grid in the Sierra Nevadas and spent the rest of her childhood looking for the mall.

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Posted on Thursday, September 13, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Maya and the Turtle: A Korean Fairy Tale
Tuttle, 2012
Hardcover, 32 pages, $14.95

This is the second illustrated book coauthored by Soma Han Stickler (Fine Art 1978) and her husband, John C. Stickler. Soma Han is a painter, sculptor, mosaic artist, and book illustrator whose work has been exhibited in galleries in the United States, Korea, and Hong Kong. The story is one she learned from her mother in Korea. Maya and the Turtle is about the rewards of kindness, patience, and courage. The protagonist, Maya, has been poor all her life, but she doesn't allow it to stop her from caring for her father, and others, as best she can. Kind and gentle, she is a lovely young girl who always puts others first. One day, she finds a little turtle and takes him home, raising and loving him, never knowing that he will play an instrumental part in her destiny.

Posted on Monday, September 10, 2012 by Allison Byers

A quarter-century ago, artist Salvatore Pecoraro and a team of assistants spent all summer creating a huge sculpture of marble, travertine and bronze to mark the entrance to a stunning new house in the Danville community of Blackhawk.
Because of the scale of the piece -- about 20 feet high, resting in a reflecting pool that is 32 feet across -- every step was carefully planned. The intent, Pecoraro says, was to create a work that appeared to have been worn by time, a relic of a bygone civilization.

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