Press Releases News

Posted on Tuesday, March 28, 2006 by Brenda Tucker

Jamie Treacy, Mystery of the Meat Rack

California College of the Arts (CCA) presents the 2006 Graduate Exhibition, featuring over 125 projects by graduating MFA, MA and MArch students in the areas of architecture, curatorial practice, design, fine arts, visual criticism and writing. The visual arts exhibition is on view from Thursday, May 11, through Saturday, May 20. In addition, a series of readings and presentations are planned from April 29 through May 3. All events are free and open to the public and take place on the CCA San Francisco campus at 1111 Eighth Street.

The Graduate Exhibition opens on May 11 with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. and a literary salon featuring readings by graduates of the MFA Program in Writing at 7:30 p.m. in room 107.

Curated by faculty member and critic Glen Helfand, the Graduate Exhibition features many new and innovative works, including a number of projects that engage political process and dialogue. For example, the graduating class of the MA Program in Curatorial Practice will use the exhibition as a platform for a commissioned project by Los Angeles–based artist Jeffrey Vallance. Titled "Preserving America's Cultural Heritage," the piece proposes a federal bill to create a fund to support visual artists working in the United States.

Some graduates of the MFA Program in Fine Arts are creating works that address international treaties and the two-party political system. Thematically, the show touches on pervasive themes of contemporary culture such as big box commerce and escapism. The show unfolds throughout the school, giving visitors the opportunity to tour much of the San Francisco campus. Hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. Images are available upon request.

Visit the exhibition website: sites.cca.edu/gradexhibition.

About the College

Founded in 1907, California College of the Arts is the largest regionally accredited, independent school of art and design in the western United States. Noted for the interdisciplinary nature and breadth of its programs, CCA offers studies in 19 undergraduate and 6 graduate majors in the areas of fine arts, architecture, design and writing. The college offers the bachelor of fine arts, bachelor of arts, bachelor of architecture, master of fine arts, master of arts and master of architecture degrees. With campuses in Oakland and San Francisco, CCA currently enrolls 1,600 full-time students.

Posted on Monday, February 20, 2006 by Brenda Tucker

Threads 2005

What will we be wearing in the future? Who are the designers of tomorrow? The answers may be revealed when California College of the Arts (CCA) hosts its second annual gala fashion show, Threads, on May 10 in San Francisco's Festival Pavilion at Fort Mason. Threads will feature the original collections of up-and-coming designers in CCA's class of 2006, in a high-caliber runway presentation with professional models. The gala event begins at 6 p.m. with a lavish cocktail reception and dinner, catered by Paula LeDuc Fine Catering, followed by the fashion show.

Lead sponsorship for the gala is generously provided by Osterweis Capital Management and by Saturn. Levi Strauss Signature is a major sponsor. Lorna Meyer and Lisa Miller are cochairs for the gala event. Individual tickets are $250 and $500; tables may be reserved for $5,000 and $10,000. Proceeds from the gala will support vital scholarships for CCA students.

"Threads was tremendously successful last year and, given the enthusiastic response we have received so far, we have every reason to believe this year will be even better," said event cochair Lisa Miller. "I'd particularly like to thank our sponsors and patrons; their support is key to the success of this event."

Cochair Lorna Meyer added, "CCA's fashion show is always one of the major highlights of the year. The gala will raise money for scholarships, assuring that the most deserving students will have access to the quality education offered at the college."

"We at Osterweis Capital Management are delighted to serve once again as lead sponsor of CCA's Threads gala. We continue to be impressed with the college's broad curriculum in art, architecture, design and writing. By supporting the college's scholarship program in this way, we are making an investment in CCA's important mission of educating those who will shape our culture in the future," commented John S. Osterweis, president and chief investment officer.

In addition, CCA is pleased to welcome Saturn as a lead sponsor:

> Saturn is a proud sponsor of the 2006 Threads gala and will display the 2007 Saturn SKY on-site. At Saturn, we never stop looking ahead. With its combination of dynamic design and agile performance, the 2007 Saturn SKY signals a bold new direction for the Saturn brand. Saturn is proud to partner with California College of the Arts, which is a leader among U.S. colleges in design education.

Established in 1996, the Fashion Design Program at CCA is an idea-driven program, emphasizing both design concepts and skill development. Students learn the technical skills of pattern making, sewing, draping and fashion illustration, as well as visual and oral communication skills. CCA offers innovative courses, passionate teaching and vigorous design discipline. The program's goal is to graduate fashion designers of great individuality and originality who will contribute to fashion as an aspect of modern art and culture as they participate in the global fashion industry. Alumni of the program have gone on to positions with such prominent designers as Donna Karan, BCBG and Alexander McQueen.

About the College

Founded in 1907, California College of the Arts (formerly California College of Arts and Crafts) is the largest regionally accredited, independent school of art and design in the western United States. Noted for the interdisciplinary nature and breadth of its programs, CCA offers studies in 19 undergraduate and 6 graduate majors in the areas of fine arts, architecture, design and writing. The college offers the bachelor of fine arts, bachelor of arts, bachelor of architecture, master of fine arts, master of arts and master of architecture degrees. With campuses in Oakland and San Francisco, CCA currently enrolls 1,600 full-time students.

Sponsors

California College of the Arts is pleased to thank Threads lead sponsors, Osterweis Capital Management and Saturn, and major sponsor, Levi Strauss Signature.

Special thanks to our Haute Couture Patrons, Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein, Claire and Noel Perry, and Barclay and Sharon Simpson; and our Nouvelle Couture Patrons, Louis Belden, Kimberly and Simon Blattner, Tecoah and Thomas Bruce, Diane Christensen and Jean Pierret, E. J. De La Rosa & Co., Inc., Janice Hansen and Jonathan N. Zakin, Ann Hatch and Paul Discoe, Nancy and Tim Howes, Leigh Hudson and Chris Panos with Lisa and Jason McDonell, Byron Kuth and Liz Ranieri, Leigh and Bill Matthes, Anthony and Celeste Meier, Lorna Meyer and Dennis Calas, Lisa and John Miller, Tim Mott and Ann Jones, Karen and Ronald Rose, Michael S. Roth and Kari Weil, Dorothy and George Saxe, Phil Schlein, Ruth and Alan L. Stein, Judy and Bill Timken, Kay Kimpton Walker and Sandy Walker, and Ronald and Anita Wornick.

In addition, CCA would like to thank our media sponsor, Surface Magazine.

Posted on Wednesday, February 15, 2006 by Brenda Tucker

The CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts presents "Utopia, Utopia = One World, One War, One Army, One Dress," an exhibition of new work by Swiss-born, Paris-based artist Thomas Hirschhorn. This multilayered project explores the current world situation, permeated by military conflicts and violence, through the metaphor of camouflage, which has been adapted from battlefield uniform to street fashion statement. Coorganized with the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), Boston, "Utopia, Utopia" is a dynamic environment comprising sculptural works, wall graphics, film and video footage, vitrines and maquettes. The exhibition is on view March 10–May 13, 2006, in the CCA Wattis Institute's Logan Galleries on the San Francisco campus of California College of the Arts. The exhibition is free and open to the public. (The ICA presentation of the exhibition was on view September 21, 2005–January 16, 2006.)

The conceptual leaping-off point for "Utopia, Utopia" is the prevalence of camouflage in contemporary culture and politics—as a style of dress on the streets of SoHo and as an emblem of battle in the current conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. On the level of fashion, camouflage signifies toughness—an affectation that draws attention to the self. In contrast, soldiers wear camouflage to disappear, to better function within the group or army by removing themselves from view. Hirschhorn sees this as an allegory for the dystopia of current events, asking what it means when a costume of war becomes a look or a style. The artist takes this fashion trend to the extreme, creating a utopian world of equality whereby military camouflage becomes the clothing of everybody on earth.

"Hirschhorn's work, like the best of philosophy, helps us to grapple with and more deeply understand the world we live in," says Ralph Rugoff, director of the CCA Wattis Institute. "Challenging yet also accessible, 'Utopia, Utopia' engages the dark side of our society while reaffirming art's power to illuminate the condition of contemporary culture."

Hirschhorn is known for energetic installations that reference philosophy, politics and pop culture. His multifaceted constructions often combine ephemeral materials, such as aluminum foil, cardboard, plastic, plywood or pages torn from magazines, with a wide array of cultural references and theoretical texts. For "Utopia, Utopia," Hirschhorn exaggerates traditional display elements from museums, combining abundant signage, illustrations, interpretive material, mannequins, vitrines and artworks.

"With its sprawling presentation and charged political content, 'Utopia, Utopia' seeks to engage visitors on many levels, literally and figuratively surrounding them with ideas," says Nicholas Baume, ICA chief curator. "Its dramatic presentation and aggressive design represent a collision of aesthetics and politics."

Philosopher Marcus Steinweg provides the major textual component of the installation design. A publication designed in collaboration with the artist documents the exhibition and includes writings by Hirschhorn and art historian Pamela M. Lee about camouflage, subjectivity and war. The publication is free to visitors.

Thomas Hirschhorn was born in 1957 in Bern, Switzerland, and lives and works in Aubervilliers, France. After studying graphic design at the Schule für Gestaltung in Zurich, Hirschhorn moved to France and joined Grapus, a Parisian collective of communist graphic designers. Since abandoning design for visual art in the mid-1980s, he has exhibited internationally, with major works included in the 1st Biennial of Johannesburg (1995), the Venice Biennale (1999) and Documenta XI (2002).

About the Wattis

Established in 1998, the CCA Wattis Institute serves as a forum for the presentation and discussion of leading-edge local, national and international contemporary culture. Through exhibitions, the Capp Street Project residency program, lectures, symposia, performances and publications in the fields of art, architecture and design, the CCA Wattis Institute fosters interaction among the students and faculty of California College of the Arts; art, architecture and design professionals; and the general public.

Generous lead sponsorship for "UTOPIA, UTOPIA = ONE WORLD, ONE WAR, ONE ARMY, ONE DRESS" is provided by Raoul Kennedy, Chara Schreyer and Gordon Freund and Susan Swig Watkins. Major support has been provided by étant donnés: The French-American Fund for Contemporary Art.

Founding support for CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts programs has been provided by Phyllis C. Wattis and Judy and Bill Timken. Generous support provided by the Phyllis C. Wattis Foundation, Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund, Ann Hatch and Paul Discoe and the CCA Curator's Forum.

Posted on Tuesday, February 14, 2006 by Brenda Tucker

Ralph Rugoff

Ralph Rugoff, director of the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, has accepted the position of director of the Hayward Gallery at the South Bank Centre in London, England. The Hayward Gallery is one of London's most important venues for the exhibition of contemporary art. Rugoff, who has been director of the CCA Wattis Institute since 2000, will leave California College of the Arts after the spring 2006 semester.

Rugoff commented, "I arrived here from London (with my British wife and our son) over five and a half years ago. It has been without doubt the richest five years of my life. My experience at the CCA Wattis Institute has been challenging, stimulating and deeply satisfying. A major part of that satisfaction has come from the warmth and support of colleagues and trustees. It also derives from the dynamic character of the college and its embrace of change and intelligent adventure, including maintaining an exhibition program that has been truly international in its ambitions. In short, I can't imagine a better place to have worked, and it is only a rare opportunity that is drawing me back to London: namely, the chance to help reshape an institution, the Hayward Gallery, that for almost 40 years has been one of the leading venues in that city for presenting contemporary art."

Rugoff added, "The past year has seen some major accomplishments for the college and CCA Wattis Institute. I look forward to seeing the Wattis continue to develop its potential, and I plan to be part of its future, contributing to next year's exhibition schedule with a group show tentatively titled 'Amateurs.' With its MA Program in Curatorial Practice and celebrated curators on the faculty, CCA is developing as a hub of curatorial thinking. I hope that a new relationship with the Hayward Gallery will add to this rich mix."

Michael S. Roth, president of California College of the Arts, commented, "For more than five years, Ralph Rugoff has done an exemplary job of leading the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts. He has made a profound impact on the contemporary art world in San Francisco, across the country and internationally. Ralph will be sorely missed, but we congratulate the Hayward Gallery in bringing a most creative mind to their great institution. We look forward to working with Ralph next year on his exhibition 'Amateurs' and to collaborations with the Hayward in the future."

About Ralph Rugoff

Ralph Rugoff has been director of the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts since 2000. His curatorial experience at the Wattis includes "Monuments for the USA," "Capp Street Project: 20th Anniversary Exhibition," "Baja to Vancouver: The West Coast and Contemporary Art" (with Daina Augaitis, Lisa Corrin, Matthew Higgs and Toby Kamps), and "Sudden Glory: Sight Gags and Slapstick in Contemporary Art." Rugoff was also the founding chair of CCA's Curatorial Practice Program.

In 2005 he won the inaugural Ordway Prize in the category of arts writer and/or curator from the Penny McCall Foundation. One of the most generous international art prizes awarded in the United States, the biennial Ordway Prize recognizes two recipients, a midcareer artist and an arts writer and/or curator, each of whom receives an unrestricted monetary award of $100,000.

Rugoff's principal publications include monographs on George Condo, Mark Wallinger and Anya Gallacio. He is the author of "Circus Americanus" (Verso). Rugoff also served as editor and coauthor of "Scene of the Crime" (MIT Press) and "At the Threshold of the Visible" (Independent Curators International). In addition, Rugoff has been a research fellow at Goldsmiths College in London and a Pew Arts Journalism Fellow at Columbia University in New York.

About the Wattis

Established in 1998, the CCA Wattis Institute serves as a forum for the presentation and discussion of leading-edge local, national and international contemporary culture. Through exhibitions, the Capp Street Project residency program, lectures, symposia, performances and publications in the fields of art, architecture and design, the CCA Wattis Institute fosters interaction among the students and faculty of California College of the Arts; art, architecture and design professionals; and the general public.

About the College

Founded in 1907, California College of the Arts (formerly California College of Arts and Crafts) is the largest regionally accredited, independent school of art and design in the western United States. Noted for the interdisciplinary nature and breadth of its programs, CCA offers studies in 19 undergraduate and 6 graduate majors in the areas of fine arts, architecture, design and writing. The college offers the bachelor of fine arts, bachelor of arts, bachelor of architecture, master of fine arts, master of arts and master of architecture degrees. With campuses in Oakland and San Francisco, CCA currently enrolls 1,600 full-time students.

Posted on Tuesday, January 24, 2006 by Brenda Tucker

Laurene Powell Jobs

Ann Hatch, chair of the Board of Trustees of California College of the Arts (CCA), has announced the appointment of four new trustees: Nancy Howes, Laurene Powell Jobs, F. Noel Perry, and Phil Schlein. Hatch commented, "Our new trustees bring a wealth of experience and a high level of commitment and energy to the college. They are joining us at an important time in the college's history, as we continue to build on CCA's reputation as one of the strongest art and design schools in the country. I'm delighted to welcome them to the CCA community."

Posted on Tuesday, December 20, 2005 by Brenda Tucker

The recruitment process is underway to find 25 West Oakland families for the fourth and final phase of "100 Families Oakland: Art & Social Change," a multiphase community art project, sponsored by F. Noel Perry and the Center for Art and Public Life at California College of the Arts (CCA). The families will come together at the M. Robinson Baker YMCA, located at 3265 Market Street in Oakland, as part of the Attitudinal Healing Connection's ArtEsteem Program.

Posted on Friday, December 16, 2005 by Brenda Tucker

Ralph Rugoff

Ralph Rugoff, director of the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, is the winner of the inaugural Ordway Prize in the category of arts writer and/or curator. This new prize, awarded by the Penny McCall Foundation, is one of the most generous international art prizes awarded in the United States. Given biennially, it recognizes two recipients, a midcareer artist and an arts writer and/or curator, each of whom will receive an unrestricted monetary award of $100,000. Doris Salcedo was the recipient of the Ordway Prize in the artist category.

Ralph Rugoff commented, "It is an unbelievable honor to receive the Ordway Prize. I am deeply grateful to Jennifer McSweeney and the Penny McCall Foundation for their foresight in establishing this prize and for their ongoing support of contemporary art and artists. It was a privilege to be nominated along with my distinguished colleagues Lynne Cooke and David Rimanelli—both of whom have had a great impact on my understanding of contemporary art. This prize also recognizes the work of the CCA Wattis Institute and the importance and relevance of its broad international focus."

About Ralph Rugoff

Since 2000, Ralph Rugoff has been director of the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts. His curatorial experience at the Wattis includes "Monuments for the USA," "Capp Street Project: 20th Anniversary Exhibition," "Baja to Vancouver: The West Coast and Contemporary Art" (with Daina Augaitis, Lisa Corrin, Matthew Higgs and Toby Kamps), and "Sudden Glory: Sight Gags and Slapstick in Contemporary Art." Rugoff was also the founding chair of CCA's Curatorial Practice Program.

Prior to coming to CCA, he co-curated (with Lisa Corrin) "The Greenhouse Effect" at the Serpentine Gallery in London. His freelance curatorial projects include "Just Pathetic," which was exhibited in Los Angeles and New York, and the touring exhibition "At the Threshold of the Visible: Minuscule and Small-Scale Art 1964-1996."

Rugoff's principal publications include monographs on George Condo, Mark Wallinger and Anya Gallacio. He is the author of "Circus Americanus" (Verso). Rugoff also served as editor and co-author of "Scene of the Crime" (MIT Press) and "At the Threshold of the Visible" (Independent Curators International). In addition, Rugoff has been a research fellow at Goldsmiths College in London and a Pew Arts Journalism Fellow at Columbia University in New York.

About the Wattis

Established in 1998, the CCA Wattis Institute serves as a forum for the presentation and discussion of leading-edge local, national and international contemporary culture. Through exhibitions, the Capp Street Project residency program, lectures, symposia, performances and publications in the fields of art, architecture and design, the CCA Wattis Institute fosters interaction among the students and faculty of California College of the Arts; art, architecture and design professionals; and the general public.

Rugoff comments, "As large museums in the United States increasingly focus on producing blockbuster shows, the task of developing truly innovative and challenging projects has been taken up by smaller, more responsive institutions like the CCA Wattis Institute. Occupying a strategic niche between artist-run spaces and museums, the Wattis Institute operates as a cultural test site or aesthetic think tank, where artists and visitors alike can experiment with new ideas about relationships among art, society, popular culture and everyday life."

About the Ordway Prize

The Ordway Prize is named in honor of McCall Foundation Director Jennifer McSweeney's great-great-aunt, Katharine Ordway, who was a philanthropist, art collector and lifelong naturalist. The prize recognizes mid-career artists and arts writers and/or curators who have made important contributions to the field of contemporary art and letters. Recipients must be at least 40 years of age and created a significant body of work over a minimum of 15 years. Nominees are considered from around the world. The short list for the 2005 Ordway Prize comprises three artists and three arts writers and/or curators selected from seven nominees in each category. The other finalists are artists Sam Durant and Senga Nengudi and curator Lynne Cooke and art critic David Rimanelli.

The nominators, who were invited by Ms. McSweeney to participate in the selection process, are a distinguished group of artists, curators, writers, museum professionals, scholars, philanthropists and leaders in the field of contemporary art.

Penny McCall Foundation

The Penny McCall Foundation (PMF), a private organization dedicated to supporting contemporary artists, arts writers, and curators, was established in 1987 by Jennifer McSweeney's late mother, Penny McCall. From 1988 to 2004, the activities of the PMF included awarding more than $2,000,000 to emerging artists, arts writers, and curators. In 2005, under Ms. McSweeney's directorship, the Foundation initiated the biennial Ordway Prize; in the intervening years, it will continue to award the Penny McCall Awards, among other initiatives.

Posted on Thursday, December 15, 2005 by Brenda Tucker

CCA student Tony Meredith was named the U.S. winner of the Translations in Tupperware global design contest, with a beautifully lit and shot photograph entitled "Tupper Rose Window," which uses multicolored and multitextured, vintage and contemporary Tupperware bowls, coasters, and tumblers to replicate a stained-glass window. He is a student in the college's Industrial Design Program.

Posted on Tuesday, November 22, 2005 by Brenda Tucker

Speaker John Danzer

Top California designers show new work at the winter 2006 Interior Designers Forum, "Beyond Green," sponsored by the Extended Education Department at California College of the Arts (CCA) and presented by best-selling design author Diane Dorrans Saeks. This dynamic, multidisciplinary forum looks "beyond green" to consider environmentally friendly design and inspiration in the broadest sense. The forum examines stylish architecture, interiors and furniture that embody wise, ecologically benign and environmentally smart practices. The speakers—seven leading interior designers, furniture designers, design practitioners and architects—will show images of their newest work and discuss their design philosophies, including aspects of the "green" house: color, sustainable materials and landscape. The forum will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, January 28, 2006, at the CCA San Francisco campus, 1111 Eighth Street.

Sim Van der Ryn of Van der Ryn Architects is the forum's keynote speaker. The program also includes special guest speaker John Danzer of Munder-Skiles, Inc., and featured speakers Martha Angus of Martha Angus, Inc.; Olle Lundberg of Lundberg Design; Melissa Mizell of Gensler; Henry Siegel of Siegel & Strain Architects; and Anni Tilt of Arkin Tilt Architects.

Moderator Diane Dorrans Saeks is the author of 17 books, most recently "Michael Smith Elements of Style" and "Hollywood Style" (both from Rizzoli). A noted editor and lecturer, Ms. Saeks has written extensively for the New York Times, Garden Design, Departures and many other design publications around the world. She is the interior design editor of PaperCity, the San Francisco editor at large for C Magazine and the California editor of Metropolitan Home.

Please note that speakers are subject to change. The cost of the forum is $120 and will include lunch. Preregistration is required. Those interested should call (510) 594-3710 to register or receive more information.

About the College

Founded in 1907, California College of the Arts (formerly California College of Arts and Crafts) is the largest regionally accredited, independent school of art and design in the western United States. Noted for the interdisciplinary nature and breadth of its programs, CCA offers studies in 19 undergraduate and 6 graduate majors in the areas of fine arts, architecture, design and writing. The college offers bachelor of architecture, bachelor of arts, bachelor of fine arts, master of architecture, master of arts and master of fine arts degrees. With campuses in Oakland and San Francisco, CCA currently enrolls 1,600 full-time students.

Posted on Monday, November 21, 2005 by Brenda Tucker

Ralph Rugoff

Ralph Rugoff, director of the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, was named one of three finalists for the inaugural Ordway Prize in the category of arts writer and/or curator. This new prize, awarded by the Penny McCall Foundation, is one of the most generous international art prizes awarded in the United States. Given biennially, it recognizes two recipients, a midcareer artist and an arts writer and/or curator, each of whom will receive an unrestricted monetary award of $100,000. The four remaining finalists will each receive awards of $7,500. Jennifer McSweeney, director of the Penny McCall Foundation, announced the six finalists on November 11. The award recipients will be revealed on December 16 at a special event in New York City.

Ralph Rugoff commented, "I am delighted to be considered for the Ordway Prize and honored to be nominated along such distinguished colleagues as Lynne Cooke and David Rimanelli."

About Ralph Rugoff

Since 2000, Ralph Rugoff has been director of the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts. His curatorial experience at the Wattis includes "Monuments for the USA," "Capp Street Project: 20th Anniversary Exhibition," "Baja to Vancouver: The West Coast and Contemporary Art" (with Daina Augaitis, Lisa Corrin, Matthew Higgs and Toby Kamps), and "Sudden Glory: Sight Gags and Slapstick in Contemporary Art."

Prior to coming to CCA, he co-curated (with Lisa Corrin) "The Greenhouse Effect" at the Serpentine Gallery in London. His freelance curatorial projects include "Just Pathetic," which was exhibited in Los Angeles and New York, and the touring exhibition "At the Threshold of the Visible: Minuscule and Small-Scale Art 1964-1996."

Rugoff's principal publications include monographs on George Condo, Mark Wallinger and Anya Gallacio. He is the author of "Circus Americanus" (Verso). Rugoff also served as editor and co-author of "Scene of the Crime" (MIT Press) and "At the Threshold of the Visible" (Independent Curators International).

In addition, Rugoff has been a research fellow at Goldsmiths College in London and a Pew Arts Journalism Fellow at Columbia University in New York.

About the Wattis

Established in 1998, the CCA Wattis Institute serves as a forum for the presentation and discussion of leading-edge local, national and international contemporary culture.

Through exhibitions, the Capp Street Project residency program, lectures, symposia, performances and publications in the fields of art, architecture and design, the CCA Wattis Institute fosters interaction among the students and faculty of California College of the Arts; art, architecture and design professionals; and the general public.

Rugoff comments, "As large museums in the United States increasingly focus on producing blockbuster shows, the task of developing truly innovative and challenging projects has been taken up by smaller, more responsive institutions like the CCA Wattis Institute. Occupying a strategic niche between artist-run spaces and museums, the Wattis Institute operates as a cultural test site or aesthetic think tank, where artists and visitors alike can experiment with new ideas about relationships among art, society, popular culture and everyday life."

About the Ordway Prize

The Ordway Prize is named in honor of Ms. McSweeney's great-great-aunt, Katharine Ordway, who was a philanthropist, art collector and lifelong naturalist. The prize recognizes mid-career artists and arts writers and/or curators who have made important contributions to the field of contemporary art and letters. Recipients must be at least 40 years of age and created a significant body of work over a minimum of 15 years. Nominees are considered from around the world.

The short list for the 2005 Ordway Prize comprises three artists and three arts writers and/or curators selected from seven nominees in each category. The other finalists are artists Sam Durant, Senga Nengudi and Doris Salcedo; curator Lynne Cooke and art critic David Rimanelli.

The nominators, who were invited by Ms. McSweeney to participate in the selection process, are a distinguished group of artists, curators, writers, museum professionals, scholars, philanthropists and leaders in the field of contemporary art.

Penny McCall Foundation

The Penny McCall Foundation (PMF), a private organization dedicated to supporting contemporary artists, arts writers, and curators, was established in 1987 by Jennifer McSweeney's late mother, Penny McCall. From 1988 to 2004, the activities of the PMF included awarding more than $2,000,000 to emerging artists, arts writers, and curators. In 2005, under Ms. McSweeney's directorship, the Foundation initiated the biennial Ordway Prize; in the intervening years, it will continue to award the Penny McCall Awards, among other initiatives.

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