Press Releases News

Posted on Monday, September 22, 2008 by Kim Lessard

Amanda Lee, Untitled, 2005

This past spring, the Graduate Program in Design at CCA became the first American academic program to join the Designers Accord. Endorsed by both the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) and the Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA), the Designers Accord is a coalition of 100,000 designers, educators, researchers, engineers, business consultants, and corporations who are working toward innovative and sustainable changes in design, industry, and consumer behavior.

Founded by CCA faculty member Valerie Casey, the Designers Accord is regarded in the international design community as a kind of Kyoto Protocol for designers.

Casey is also a lead designer at IDEO, where she creates socially and environmentally sustainable products, services, and business models for companies around the world. She founded the Designers Accord in January 2008, recognizing the need for a more organized effort by designers worldwide to make positive changes with respect to the environmental and social impact of design and industry.

"By adopting the Designers Accord, the Graduate Program in Design affirms its commitment to sustainability and to the sharing of knowledge and expertise with a global community of committed members representing each design discipline," says Brenda Laurel, chair of CCA's Graduate Program in Design.

Read more about the Designers Accord at www.designersaccord.org.
Read more about CCA's Graduate Program in Design at www.cca.edu/design.

About California College of the Arts

Founded in 1907, California College of the Arts (CCA) is noted for the interdisciplinarity and breadth of its programs. It offers studies in 20 undergraduate and seven graduate majors in the areas of fine arts, architecture, design, and writing. The college offers bachelor of architecture, bachelor of arts, bachelor of fine arts, master of architecture, master of arts, master of fine arts, and master of business administration degrees.

With campuses in Oakland and San Francisco, CCA currently enrolls more than 1,650 full-time students. Noted alumni include the painters Nathan Oliveira and Raymond Saunders; the ceramicists Robert Arneson, Viola Frey, and Peter Voulkos; the filmmaker Wayne Wang; the conceptual artists David Ireland and Dennis Oppenheim; and the designers Lucille Tenazas and Michael Vanderbyl. For more information about CCA, visit www.cca.edu.

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Posted on Wednesday, August 27, 2008 by Brenda Tucker

The CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts announces the continuation of the exhibition Americana in the Mary Augustine Gallery (a special vitrine in the shape of the United States) on the San Francisco campus of California College of the Arts. The exhibition, begun in September 2007 and now entering its second year, is organized by Jens Hoffmann (director of the Wattis Institute) and CCA's Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice. It is free and open to the public.

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Posted on Friday, August 15, 2008 by Kim Lessard

Students and faculty from the Jewelry / Metal Arts Program at California College of the Arts are calling on local residents to donate their unwanted jewelry—gold, silver, or other—between now and September 11, 2008, to be recycled into exciting new pieces for the Radical Jewelry Makeover. A nationwide program, the Radical Jewelry Makeover was founded by Ethical Metalsmiths, an artist-run nonprofit organization that is working to galvanize mining reform efforts and educate the public about alternatives to traditional mining practices and jewelry production.

Jewelry donations can be made at the drop box located in the Jewelry / Metal Arts Program offices at CCA's Oakland campus (5212 Broadway), or mailed to the Richmond Art Center at 2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond CA 94804. Donations can also be made at any of the other participating organizations (for more information, see radicaljewelrymakeover.blogspot.com).

The unique, handmade pieces from the Radical Jewelry Makeover will be exhibited and offered for sale October 22–November 9 at Velvet da Vinci, 2015 Polk Street (between Broadway and Pacific), San Francisco. There will be a reception on Friday October 24. Jewelry donors receive discount coupons, and all sales benefit Ethical Metalsmiths' efforts to inform and connect people with responsibly sourced materials. CCA students will work together on the project with other participating Bay Area organizations, schools, and studios, including Metal Arts Guild San Francisco, Academy of Art University, City College, the Crucible, Revere Academy, Richmond Art Center, and Scintillant Studio.

The San Francisco Bay Area Radical Jewelry Makeover will be the largest event to date. According to Ethical Metalsmiths, San Francisco Bay is lined with several feet of sediment from hydraulic gold mining that took place more than a century ago, and the waters are contaminated with dangerous levels of mercury as a result. The organization Earthworks reports that an estimated 80 percent of the gold mined each year is used for jewelry, and that a single gold ring leaves 20 tons of mine waste. Mining is currently the most toxic industry in the nation, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

About California College of the Arts

Founded in 1907, California College of the Arts (CCA) is noted for the interdisciplinarity and breadth of its programs. It offers studies in 20 undergraduate and seven graduate majors in the areas of fine arts, architecture, design, and writing. The college offers bachelor of architecture, bachelor of arts, bachelor of fine arts, master of architecture, master of arts, master of fine arts, and master of business administration degrees. With campuses in Oakland and San Francisco, CCA currently enrolls more than 1,650 full-time students. Noted alumni include the painters Nathan Oliveira and Raymond Saunders; the ceramicists Robert Arneson, Viola Frey, and Peter Voulkos; the filmmaker Wayne Wang; the conceptual artists David Ireland and Dennis Oppenheim; and the designers Lucille Tenazas and Michael Vanderbyl.

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Posted on Tuesday, August 12, 2008 by Brenda Tucker

The CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts announces the continuation of the exhibition Tino Sehgal in the Logan Galleries on the San Francisco campus of California College of the Arts. The exhibition, now entering its second year, is organized by Jens Hoffmann, director of the Wattis Institute, and Claire Fitzsimmons, deputy director of the Wattis Institute. It is free and open to the public.

Since September 2007 the Wattis Institute has been presenting, concurrently with its other exhibitions, Sehgal's first solo show in the United States.

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Posted on Wednesday, August 6, 2008 by Kim Lessard

Lydia Nakashima Degarrod, Jaime's Memories of His Journey from Chile to California, 2008

The artist Lydia Nakashima Degarrod explores emotional and physical aspects of memory and migration in her multimedia installation Geographies of the Imagination at California College of the Arts from October 29 through November 21, 2008. The exhibition takes place in the Oliver Art Center on CCA's Oakland campus at 5212 Broadway. There will be an opening reception on Wednesday, October 29, from 5:30–7:30 p.m. The exhibition and reception are free and open to the public.

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Posted on Wednesday, August 6, 2008 by Kim Lessard

La artista Lydia Nakashima Degarrod explora aspectos emocionales y fí­sicos de la memoria y migración en su instalación multimedia Geografí­as de la imaginación en el California College of Arts del 29 de octubre al 21 de noviembre, 2008. La exposición se lleva a cabo en el Centro de Arte Oliver en el campus de Oakland del California College of Arts, localizado en el 5212 de la calle Broadway. Habrá una recepción de apertura el miércoles, 29 de octubre de 5:30 a 7:30 p.m.

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Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2008 by Brenda Tucker

The CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts will present The Exhibition Formerly Known as Passengers from September 2, 2008, through August 29, 2009, in the upper-level Logan Galleries on the San Francisco campus of California College of the Arts. The exhibition is organized by Jens Hoffmann, director of the Wattis Institute. It is free and open to the public, with an opening reception on Tuesday, September 2, from 6–8 p.m. On the first Tuesday of every month during the run of the show, there will be a short artist talk at 7 p.m.

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Posted on Thursday, July 10, 2008 by Brenda Tucker

The CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts will present the exhibition The Wizard of Oz from September 2 through December 13, 2008, in the lower-level Logan Galleries on the San Francisco campus of California College of the Arts. The exhibition is organized by Jens Hoffmann, director of the Wattis Institute. It is free and open to the public, with an opening reception on Tuesday, September 2, from 6–8 p.m.

The Wizard of Oz features works by 22 international artists. It takes as its starting point L.

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Posted on Friday, June 13, 2008 by Kim Lessard

Sanjit Sethi

California College of the Arts (CCA) President Stephen Beal announced today the appointment of Sanjit Sethi, chair of CCA's Community Arts Program, and Ann Wettrich, associate director of arts education at CCA's Center for Art and Public Life, as the new codirectors of the Center for Art and Public Life, effective immediately.

The Center for Art and Public Life plays a key role in keeping the college connected to the diverse communities that surround it, both through service-learning programs such as Community Student Fellows and through community-building art projects organized through the Visiting Artists and Scholars program.

In fall 2005, drawing on the center's success with managing programs that represent the college's commitment to civic engagement, CCA became the first art school to offer a BFA in Community Arts. 100 Families Oakland, a citywide community art program first implemented by the center, has become a model for similar programs now being planned in other American cities.

The center has also been a major influence in the ongoing struggle to keep high-quality art education thriving in public schools. In 2007 Wettrich oversaw the creation of the Teaching Institute, a comprehensive, year-round development program for educators and teaching artists working with students from prekindergarten through the 12th grade.

Says President Beal, "CCA remains committed to the vital and important work of the Center for Art and Public Life. We support its vision in bringing CCA students and faculty together with community partners for meaningful work that enriches the lives of Bay Area residents. So much has been accomplished in the 10 years since the founding of the center. I look forward to working with Ann and Sanjit to continue the momentum."

Both Sethi and Wettrich will continue teaching at CCA; Sethi will remain chair of the Community Arts Program, and Wettrich will continue to head the SMART (Subject Matter Art) teaching concentration program for CCA students who plan to enter postgraduate teacher credential programs.

Sethi and Wettrich comment, "We are excited to be collaboratively engaged in directing the center, drawing on its well-established foundation and the successes it has achieved. We look forward to bringing in new ideas and working with students, faculty, staff, and community partners to continue to evolve a diversity of approaches to artistic practice in the public realm."

Sethi and Wettrich succeed Sonia BasSheva Mañjon, who served as executive director of the center from 2000 to 2008; Mañjon was recently named vice president of diversity and strategic partnerships at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut.

About Sanjit Sethi

Born in Rochester, New York, Sethi received a BFA in 1994 from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University, an MFA in 1998 from the University of Georgia, and an MS in advanced visual studies in 2002 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has been an artist in residence at the Banff Centre in Alberta, Canada; a visiting assistant professor at Saint Mary's College in Notre Dame, Indiana; and an instructor at the Art Institute of Chicago.

After completing a Fulbright fellowship in Bangalore, India, working on the Building Nomads Project, he continued his strong focus on interdisciplinary collaboration as director of the MFA program at the Memphis College of Art. His work deals with issues of nomadism, identity, the residue of labor, and memory. Sethi recently completed the Kuni Wada Bakery Remembrance, an olfactory-based memorial in Memphis. His current works include Urban Defibrillator, the Gypsy Bridge Project, and a collaboration with the Richmond Art Center and the Main Street Initiative of Richmond, California, all of which involve varied social and geographic communities.

About Ann Wettrich

Ann Wettrich has served as associate director of arts education at CCA's Center for Art and Public Life since 2001. She developed, and teaches in, the SMART (Subject Matter Art) teaching concentration program. Wettrich has been a leader in the Bay Area art education community for 30 years, developing innovative programs, events, and publications through her work with the San Francisco Arts Commission, the Oakland Craft and Cultural Arts Department, the Arts Education Funders Collaborative, and the San Francisco Arts Education Project.

As a consultant, she wrote and facilitated the Arts Master Plan for the Oakland Unified School District and conducted needs assessment and evaluation studies for Cultural Initiatives Silicon Valley and the Marin Community Foundation. She is a published author and serves on numerous panels, commissions, advisory groups, and committees for local and statewide arts organizations. She chairs the art education committee for the Alameda County Arts Commission, serves on the steering and governance committees for the Alameda County Alliance for Arts Learning Leadership, and is a member of the program planning committee of UC Berkeley's Arts Education Initiative.

About the Center for Art and Public Life

The Center for Art and Public Life was founded by California College of the Arts (CCA) in 1998 for the purpose of creating and facilitating programs that provide and enhance arts education in underserved communities within and beyond the San Francisco Bay Area. The center fosters opportunities for CCA students and working artists to partner with public schools and community organizations, where they use their talents to make a difference as mentors for youth and leaders in community development.

The center administers CCA's Community Arts Program, the art teacher precredential program, and courses in diversity studies. It also offers intensive professional development opportunities through its recently established Teaching Institute, a comprehensive, year-round development program for educators and teaching artists working with students from prekindergarten through the 12th grade.

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Posted on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 by Kim Lessard

The Center for Art and Public Life (CAPL) at California College of the Arts (CCA), in conjunction with Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA), presents What's the Big Idea?: Identity Shifts—CCA Students Collaborate with Bay Area Youth and Community, an exhibition exploring concepts of identity, culture, and humanity, May 22 through June 16, 2008, with an opening reception on Thursday, May 22, at 6:30 p.m. The exhibition and reception are both free and open to the public. They take place at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, 701 Mission Street, San Francisco.

The exhibition features work created through CCA's Community Student Fellows program, which is facilitated by CAPL and places CCA students in Bay Area public (K–12) schools and other community organizations. The students work side by side with artists and arts administrators and take an active role in the development of new models of practice in community-based arts, cultural diversity, learning, and youth development through the arts. During the 2007–8 academic year, 34 Community Student Fellows worked with 23 different organizations.

The presentation takes place in YBCA's Room for Big Ideas. YBCA invites artists, curators, and collectives from across the Bay Area to use the Room for Big Ideas to showcase innovative and interactive art practices that support emerging local artists and promote intersections among community, civic engagement, and arts education. Each year YBCA poses a selection of "Big Ideas" to artists and the community at large. This exhibition

responds to one of the current "Big Ideas"—identity shifts—which asks participants to rethink how we know who we are, now that traditional definitions of race, gender, and nationality are breaking down and becoming open to interpretation.

"The idea of identity resonates throughout these projects, and the outcome is revealing," observes Susan McMahon, CAPL program associate. One group of students at Far West High School in Oakland expressed their ideas about identity through fashion design. At Washington High School in Fremont, students explored the concept of identity through abstraction and geography by making their own cartographic interpretations of their physical environment.

About the Center for Art and Public Life

The Center for Art and Public Life (CAPL) was founded by California College of the Arts (CCA) in 1998 for the purpose of creating and facilitating programs that provide and enhance arts education in underserved communities within and beyond the San Francisco Bay Area. CAPL fosters opportunities for CCA students and working artists to partner with public schools and community organizations, where they use their talents to make a difference as mentors for youth and leaders in community development. CAPL administers CCA's Community Arts Program as well as the art teacher pre-credential program and courses in diversity studies. It also offers intensive programs in arts education and integration for K–12 educators through the Art in Education Teaching Institute.

About California College of the Arts

Founded in 1907, California College of the Arts (CCA) is noted for the interdisciplinarity and breadth of its programs. It offers studies in 20 undergraduate and seven graduate majors in the areas of fine arts, architecture, design, and writing. The college offers bachelor of architecture, bachelor of arts, bachelor of fine arts, master of architecture, master of arts, master of fine arts, and master of business administration degrees. With campuses in Oakland and San Francisco, CCA currently enrolls more than 1,650 full-time students. Noted alumni include the painters Nathan Oliveira and Raymond Saunders; the ceramicists Robert Arneson, Viola Frey, and Peter Voulkos; the filmmaker Wayne Wang; the conceptual artists David Ireland and Dennis Oppenheim; and the designers Lucille Tenazas and Michael Vanderbyl.

Read the rest

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