Sculpture News

Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

After graduating from California’s College of the Arts, where her primary medium was sculpture, Lush said, she was turned off by the “pretentiousness” of the art world. She found the entertainment world a better fit.

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Posted on Monday, July 8, 2013 by Jim Norrena

Recent graduate Kellie Wolfe (Sculpture 2013) describes the project she began working on in Barney Haynes's Interface course as "a steel pedestal that holds an animatronic stomach that moves based on the viewer's interaction with it." The piece measures 48" x 7" x 5" and undulates with the viewer's movements.

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Posted on Monday, July 8, 2013 by Allison Byers

"I was interested in exploring that impulse to perform and repeat American history and something that seemed very nationalistic and conservative and hetero normative," she explains. "A lot of the re-enactments I went to seemed like performances of masculinity, so I wanted to look at it."

The California College of the Arts professor, 41, holds a master's degree in sculpture from Yale, and her work has been acquired by the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Saatchi Gallery London.

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Posted on Monday, July 8, 2013 by Allison Byers

The cardinal rule of home buying is "location, location, location." But it can also apply to educational institutions.

"Any college or university takes much of its character from its location," says Stephen Beal, president of California College of the Arts. "An increasing part of a student's education isn't just about what's happening in the classroom, but also outside of it."

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Posted on Thursday, July 4, 2013 by Jim Norrena

CCA's booth at Maker Faire received two Make magazine editor's choice awards

Ever since the college was founded in 1907, making art has defined what we do at California College of the Arts -- both what we create and how we create it.

Today we have a new challenge to how we create art. The Bay Area has become a vast melting pot of innovation driven by the demands of technology-reliant and design-savvy enthusiasts.

We live in the innovation corridor -- a unique stomping grounds where the doers and makers are integrating time-honored principles of craft into the ever-changing technological landscape.

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Posted on Thursday, June 13, 2013 by Allison Byers

Glen Helfand is with the California College of Arts in San Francisco. He says, "There used to be a network of grants that artists could get to fund projects. I mean way back in the ancient history, galleries might have given artists stipends. Now it's a much tougher game."

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Posted on Monday, June 10, 2013 by Allison Byers

Now a tenured professor and Chair of the Sculpture department at the California College of the Arts, Smith was once an emerging artist living in New York City. In 2004, she began a series of large-scale public art events hinged on the aesthetic vernacular of the American Civil War. The project, called The Muster, took its name from a military term meaning a gathering of troops to critique, exercise, and display. The project culminated with an encampment on Governors Island in 2005.

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Posted on Monday, June 10, 2013 by Allison Byers

Social practice is a relatively new term for art that puts less emphasis on objects made for individual contemplation and more energy into projects involving participation, activism or community organizing. Of course, plenty of artists were making art like this before critics and scholars christened it “social practice.” One such artist is Allison Smith, whose exhibition “Allison Smith: Rudiments of Fife and Drum” combines elements of craft, performance and participation and is currently on view at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Conn.

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Posted on Sunday, May 26, 2013 by Jim Norrena

What exactly is the connection between art and science?

CCA's division of humanities and sciences has developed a thoroughly interdisciplinary, two-year thematic curricular project called Exploring Science in the Studio to keep this question on the minds of undergraduates, as they consider courses that satisfy their science requirements.

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Posted on Thursday, May 23, 2013 by Allison Byers

Attending the MFA show at one of the Bay Area's large art schools is like getting bludgeoned by art. After about a half-dozen presentations I am full, my critical faculties have been short-circuited and I have been forced into submission. Think about it, at any given group show, you might see one or two pieces from (at the most) twenty artists. Or on any Art Murmur or First Thursday outing, you might visit five or ten solo shows.

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