Sculpture News

Posted on Thursday, June 13, 2013 by Allison Byers

Glen Helfand is with the California College of Arts in San Francisco. He says, "There used to be a network of grants that artists could get to fund projects. I mean way back in the ancient history, galleries might have given artists stipends. Now it's a much tougher game."

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Posted on Monday, June 10, 2013 by Allison Byers

Now a tenured professor and Chair of the Sculpture department at the California College of the Arts, Smith was once an emerging artist living in New York City. In 2004, she began a series of large-scale public art events hinged on the aesthetic vernacular of the American Civil War. The project, called The Muster, took its name from a military term meaning a gathering of troops to critique, exercise, and display. The project culminated with an encampment on Governors Island in 2005.

Posted on Monday, June 10, 2013 by Allison Byers

Social practice is a relatively new term for art that puts less emphasis on objects made for individual contemplation and more energy into projects involving participation, activism or community organizing. Of course, plenty of artists were making art like this before critics and scholars christened it “social practice.” One such artist is Allison Smith, whose exhibition “Allison Smith: Rudiments of Fife and Drum” combines elements of craft, performance and participation and is currently on view at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Conn.

Posted on Sunday, May 26, 2013 by Jim Norrena

What exactly is the connection between art and science?

CCA's division of humanities and sciences has developed a thoroughly interdisciplinary, two-year thematic curricular project called Exploring Science in the Studio to keep this question on the minds of undergraduates, as they consider courses that satisfy their science requirements.

Posted on Thursday, May 23, 2013 by Allison Byers

Attending the MFA show at one of the Bay Area's large art schools is like getting bludgeoned by art. After about a half-dozen presentations I am full, my critical faculties have been short-circuited and I have been forced into submission. Think about it, at any given group show, you might see one or two pieces from (at the most) twenty artists. Or on any Art Murmur or First Thursday outing, you might visit five or ten solo shows.

Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Shawn HibmaCronan (Sculpture and Furniture 2009)

My studio is in a large, charmingly aged industrial space in an old hangar on the Alameda Naval Air Base. The building is at the end of a runway that extends south into the heart of San Francisco Bay.

The industrial capacity of the site, combined with the privacy and central view of the Bay Area, make for an incredible working environment. The material qualities and patina of the space mesh well with my work, which gets done via long days, late nights, loud music, and heavy-duty machinery.

Photography by Andria Lo

Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Allison Smith (Sculpture chair)

My studio is located in a storefront in downtown Oakland, near project spaces such as Creative Growth and Rock Paper Scissors Collective that combine forms of making, presentation, and exchange. It is conceived as a general store that houses my ongoing project SMITHS, in which I invite various makers to conduct hands-on workshops.

It is also my studio space, office, archive, library, and home. I'm interested in the idea of a general store as a contact zone or space of intimate public exchange that is both material and intellectual. The studio holds my materials, research, remnants of past projects, and works in progress.

Photography by Andria Lo

Posted on Monday, April 15, 2013 by

"Three hours of sitting in a chair and kissing my girlfriend seemed like an amusing thing to get paid for," muses Susannah Magers (MA Curatorial Practice 2011), reminiscing about the work-study position that she’ll probably always remember as one of the oddest jobs of her career.

Between 2007 and 2012, Magers and dozens of other CCA undergrad and grad students got paid by the college to serve as interpreters of artworks by the contemporary art phenom Tino Sehgal. The Sehgal artworks were presented one at a time, continuously over those six years, at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, in conjunction with its regular exhibition programming. The participating students all had to audition, and then, if selected, went through a rigorous training and worked many hours a week for the 12-week duration of the piece.

Often the works called for interactions with gallery visitors that were deliberately disjunctive -- somewhere between pranksterism and institutional critique -- and surprising to many attendees, who showed up expecting a nice, sedate gallery experience rather than some kind of live intervention.

For some of the students it was a thrilling brush with fame in the form of an international art star. For others it was just another (albeit pretty out-there) work-study gig. A few finished their first day in tears. And many came away from the experience with their own artistic or curatorial practice forever changed.

Posted on Thursday, March 28, 2013 by Allison Byers

California artist Ann Weber began her career making large ceramic pottery. She studied with Viola Frey at California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, whose totemic clay figures inspired the scale of Weber's own work.

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Posted on Thursday, March 21, 2013 by Allison Byers

A product is being developed out of the Forest Products Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin collaborating with artist Christine Lee and US Department of Agriculture's John F. Hunt. The product in process is a MDF alternative using no resins and a combination of biodegradable and recycled materials such as used cardboard, cow manure and sawdust.