Sustainability News

Posted on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

This rustic cabin, located in Topanga Canyon in California, was designed by Mason St. Peter—a graduate of the California College of the Arts in San Francisco. While visiting a friend in a similar studio, St. Peter was inspired and began to work with the owner to create a space of their own using his materials. 

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Posted on Monday, August 25, 2014 by Laura Braun

At the California College of the Arts (CCA), painting and fine arts professor Kim Anno is leading the way by developing a degree that covers the intersection of art, science, and the environment. CCA was the also first college to participate at the United Nations’ Climate Summits. Anno notes, “There is a distinction between art and activism. They do have overlaps, but they also have differences. Sometimes viewers discount the images of activism if they are too pat, too quickly understood.

Posted on Monday, August 18, 2014 by Laura Braun

Anno, a professor of painting and fine arts at California College of the Arts (CCA), was impressed. "We marveled at Nasheed's bravery and conceptual skill," she says. "Then we discussed what it would look like if the sea was encroaching on our country, what it would take to adapt. We looked up the statistics of how many people needed to be relocated and read that no country had yet volunteered to take the Maldives' citizens in."

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Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2014 by Laura Braun

Polyester, a synthetic and non-biodegradable fiber, makes up more than half of the world's fiber market. Polyester from plastic bottles is the most recycled fiber for new clothing products-it constitutes 10 percent of global polyester production-and has been around for about 25 years, says Lynda Grose, associate professor of fashion design at California College of the Arts.

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Posted on Monday, July 21, 2014 by Jim Norrena

Ghetto Goldilocks is part of the 25th Street Collective in downtown Oakland

It used to be when an article of clothing became outworn you either gave it away or you threw it away. Those were the options.

Yet today's artists are using their arts education to revisit, rethink, and ultimately repurpose how to use discarded materials in ways that are socially rewarding, environmentally sustainable, and downright eye-catching!

Ghetto Goldilocks

Briget Campbell (BFA Ceramics 2005) is the proprietor of Ghetto Goldilocks, which is part of the 25th Street Collective located at 477 25th Street in downtown Oakland. Artist-merchants within the collective are producing works that not only attract art consumers but also those consumers who are looking for sustainable products.

In Campbell's case, she has ingeniously repurposed recycled and discarded clothing pieces to re-create new fashion pieces that are unique, stylish, comfortable . . . and literally built to last. She takes yesterday's forgotten mediocrity and makes today's stunningly memorable fashion statements.

Posted on Thursday, July 10, 2014 by Laura Braun

The successor to Fletcher's first book, Sustainable Fashion & Textiles – Design Journeys, Fletcher and Grose explore sustainable fashion from a designer's perspective, presenting the role of the designer in accelerating sustainable change as a communicator, activist and entrepreneur.

Posted on Monday, June 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

After he was diagnosed with cancer at age 14, he was homeschooled by his mother and spent hours drawing, painting and doing ceramics. After completing a bachelor's in fine arts at California College of the Arts he left for Hawaii to build his first tree house, using hand tools and material found on the beaches and forests. When he came back to San Francisco to do a show of his paintings at Needles & Pens store, he made another tree house using recycled urban stuff and lived there for a month.

Posted on Wednesday, May 28, 2014 by Laura Braun

Preservation as revelation: a bus maintenance building from 1951 designed by Skidmore Owings & Merrill was converted into the San Francisco campus of this 107-year-old institution. The architecture firm Leddy Maytum Stacy in the late 1990s filled the gaunt industrial structure with studios, classrooms and galleries lining an immense central "nave" beneath skylights.

Posted on Monday, May 5, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Gregory Kloen with a work in progress [photo: Rachel Walther]

Gregory Kloehn (Glass 1998) is working hard to build a better community -- literally. At his West Oakland live-work space, he is engaged in an ongoing project to build mobile shelters for the homeless residents of his neighborhood.

His efforts have attracted attention from all over the world, and from all types, from off-the-grid survivalists to the media (he’s been featured on Inside Edition, Rachel, and many other shows) to green-minded micro-home design enthusiasts.

Read the San Jose Mercury News and KQED features on Gregory Kloehn.

Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2014 by Chris Bliss

Harriet Street Student Residences

The Harriet Street Student Residences building in San Francisco has successfully achieved LEED platinum level -- the highest level of certification -- by the U.S. Green Building Council, an organization committed to a prosperous and sustainable future for our nation through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings.

LEED certification is recognized across the globe as the premier mark of achievement in sustainable building.

Some of the “green” features of CCA's Harriet Street Residences include 

  • Natural light and ventilation
  • Solar water heating
  • Stainless steel Energy Star appliances
  • Rainwater harvesting
  • Low-flow fixtures
  • High recycled content
  • Reduced construction waste