Textiles News

Posted on Thursday, February 11, 2010 by Sarah Owens

Diana in her studioView slideshow 

CCA alumna and ceramicist Diana Fayt (Ceramics 1992) works out of a sunny studio in San Francisco's Bayview / Hunters Point district. Born in Sunnyvale, California, to a Hungarian family of craftspeople and circus performers, Diana is the first person in her family to attend college.

Always open to new opportunities, her path to success has been winding and filled with good friends and fortune.

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Posted on Wednesday, July 22, 2009 by Jim Norrena

The 14th Annual Yozo Hamaguchi Winners
2009 Printmaking Scholarship Awards

The 2009 Hamaguchi Awards exhibition is scheduled for August 27 through September 9 in the Isabelle Percy West Gallery on the Oakland campus.

The six undergraduates listed below each received a $2,500 tuition scholarship.

  • Julian Farmar-Bowers
  • Adam Gersh
  • Sam Handleman
  • Will Manville
  • Fonda Murray
  • June Yoon

The 2009 jury committee

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Posted on Monday, June 8, 2009 by Brenda Tucker

California College of the Arts is pleased to host A Lady Found a Culture in Its Cloth: Barack Obama's Mother and Indonesian Batiks, June 18-21, on CCA's San Francisco campus (1111 Eighth Street, at 16th and Wisconsin). The show will feature 20 large fabrics and two scarves from the batik collection of Ann Dunham, President Barack Obama's late mother. The collection has been in storage for many years and this is a valuable opportunity for the public to see it.

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Posted on Thursday, January 15, 2009 by Lindsey Westbrook

A student works in the garden

Fast food generally isn't healthy. But it is easy, quick, and cheap.

You could say the same about the synthetic chemical dyes that are used to color our clothes. And just as the "slow food" movement first took hold in the Bay Area—where the population is more socially sensitive, health conscious, and willing to experiment—the Bay Area is also home to the "slow textiles" movement, promoting sustainable, whole-systems thinking in the realms of textiles and fashion.

Sasha Duerr has emerged as a key player in this.

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Posted on Thursday, May 22, 2008 by Molly Mitchell

Master Yasuo Nakajima of Hanyu City, Japan, is a master indigo dyer and successor to the family business founded in the mid-19th century, Nakajima Indigo Dye Works. Master Nakajima continues to operate the dye-works using the traditional methods of natural indigo dyes, kept alive in sunken earthenware vats. As a designated regional Living Treasure of Japan, Master Nakajima's goal is to impart his experience, skills, and knowledge to the next generation of artisans and artists wishing to work with traditional Japanese indigo dye techniques.

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Posted on Monday, March 24, 2008 by Brenda Tucker

Master Yasuo Nakajima of Hanyu City, Japan, participated in CCA Textiles Program's Maters of Tradition Series

Master Yasuo Nakajima Sensei (master indigo dyer) of Hanyu City, Japan, participated in CCA Textiles Program's Masters of Tradition series on the Oakland campus, where he was artist-in-residence March 24-28, 2008.

Many regular classes in the Textiles Program were suspended, and Master Nakajima and and his entourage of experts taught a series of workshops on indigo dyeing and traditional stitching that included customary dyeing and surface design methods, such as ikat, shibori, and katazome.

Mr. Nakajima is a master indigo dyer and successor to the family business that was founded in the mid-19th century, Nakajima Indigo Dye Works. Master Nakajima continues to operate the dye-works using the traditional methods of natural indigo dyes kept alive in sunken earthenware vats.

As a designated regional Living Treasure of Japan, Master Nakajima's goal is to impart his experience, skills, and knowledge to the next generation of artisans and artists wishing to work with traditional Japanese indigo dye techniques.

Also teaching were Kiyo Oshio Sensei (master stitcher), Kumiko Toya (stitcher), and Daigo Niijima (indigo dyer). Dignitaries visiting CCA with Nakajima Sensei included Mr. Koumei Kawata (mayor of Hanyu City, Saitama Prefecture) and his wife, Mrs. Midori Kawata, Jyun Saito (the mayor's secretary), and Hideo Ninomiya Sensei (clothing manufacturer from Hanyu City).

CCA Provost Stephen Beal hosted a dinner that was attended by Associate Dean Mark Takiguchi and Textiles Program Chair Deborah Valoma who honored the guests from Japan.

In an effort to bring traditional skills and voices into the curriculum, CCA's Textiles Program has cultivated a nine-year relationship with Master Nakajima. During week-long residencies occurring in 1997, 2002, and 2005, and now again in 2008, Master Nakajima taught, demonstrated, and lectured about a wide variety of indigo dye techniques.

These intensive learning experiences focused the attention of the entire student body on the depth and breadth of Japanese indigo dye techniques. Just as important, these cross-cultural encounters provided a unique opportunity for students to be immersed in Japanese aesthetic and philosophical approaches.

The Textiles Program is deeply committed to bringing diverse voices and viewpoints into the curriculum at all levels. In the classroom they have hosted traditional artists, including Tongan tapa makers, Mien embroiderers, traditional French-lace makers, and Native American basket weavers, among others.

Recently the Textiles Program established the biennial Masters of Tradition series. Every other spring semester the program invites a master of a textile tradition to teach workshops available to all students interested in taking a textile course.

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Posted on Thursday, November 15, 2007 by Sarah Owens

Micah Landworth, Lab Coat, 2007

Lab coat designs by CCA students took the runway on October 11, 2007, at the first annual Above & Beyond Gala at the San Francisco Design Center. The creatively reinterpreted hospital garments, worn by live models, were designed by CCA students in courses led by Textiles adjunct professor Richard Elliott and students from the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising. The coats were bold conflations of art and science, ranging from bright green to pink with patterns mimicking cancer cells, bacteria, and stitches.

The Above & Beyond Gala also featured a performance by Gregangelo and Velocity Circus, a theatrical and acrobatic troupe led by CCA alumnus Gregangelo Herrera (Individualized Major 1989). Their spectacular show invoked the beauties of science with acrobats and dancers decked out in costumes whose patterns, under black light, showed images of the inside of the human body. Their props were inspired by iconic scientific images such as the double helix.

The gala benefited NCIRE, the Veterans Health Research Institute, the country's largest nonprofit research institute associated with a Veterans Administration medical center. For more information on the NCIRE please visit www.ncire.org.

Photos by Gitty Duncan

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Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 by Molly Mitchell

In May 2006, Native American basket weaver Julia Florence Parker taught a one-day workshop at California College of the Arts as part of the Masters of Tradition series, which was attended by students taking courses in the Textiles Program.

Parker spoke of her life, told stories, and taught students traditional willow twinning with materials she had gathered in the Sierra Nevada. Parker has been a long-term friend of the Textiles Program, during which time she has taught several workshops and shared her unique perspectives on Native American textile arts.

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