Visual Studies News

Posted on Monday, July 25, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

Terrence Malick: Film and Philosophy
Continuum, 2011
Hardcover, 240 pages, $130

Terrence Malick's four feature films have been celebrated by critics and adored as instant classics among film aficionados, but the body of critical literature devoted to them has remained surprisingly small in comparison to Malick's stature in the world of contemporary film. Critical Studies faculty Stuart Kendall edits this volume in which Malick's films are discussed as individual objects, as a corpus, within contemporary film studies, and within a wider cultural discussion. Each of the essays is grounded in film studies, philosophical inquiry, and the emerging field of scholarship that combines the two disciplines.

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Posted on Monday, July 11, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

The Ends of Art and Design
Infra-Thin Press, 2011
Paperback, 108 pages, $14.75

The design arts are to our age of experience what the fine arts were to the era of representation, but with crucial differences. Whereas the fine arts offered critical-reflective experiences to independent subjects within the era of representation, the design fields now produce experience-events in a post-subjective world. Stuart Kendall (Visual Studies faculty) proposes a new way to think about the relationship between design and culture as well as new roles for design education within the Humanities, and for the Humanities within design education. If the design fields are the primary agents of contemporary culture, they should be the primary focus of contemporary cultural studies.

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Posted on Wednesday, June 29, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

Aerodrome Orion and Starry Messenger
Kelsey Street Press, 2010
Paperback, 74 pages, $17.95

Susan Gevirtz (Visual Studies and Fine Arts faculty) orchestrates the relationships between many different types of skies, among them: the technological sky as mapped by air traffic controllers, the sky stressed by the demands of our global economy, a politically charged sky, nature's sky as plotted by ancient astronomers, the swan sky of Hans Christian Andersen, and the starry sky that dazzles our romantic imaginations. Her poetry flies reconnaissance to open possibilities for what poetry can be: "a stolen guide for the farthest ocean" or a set of instructions for navigating the jetstream of our personal and collective lives.

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Posted on Wednesday, June 1, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

Jacques Rancière: An Introduction
Continuum, 2011
Paperback, 208 pages, $24.95

The first comprehensive introduction to one of the most influential French thinkers writing today, this book explores Rancière's ideas on philosophy, aesthetics, and politics. Visual and Critical Studies faculty member Joseph Tanke situates Rancière's distinctive approach against the backdrop of Continental philosophy and extends his insights into current discussions of art and politics. Tanke explains how Rancière's ideas allow us to understand art as having a deeper social role than is customarily assigned to it as well as how political opposition can be revitalized. Engaging with many untranslated and unpublished sources, the book will also be of interest to Rancière's long-time readers.

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Posted on Tuesday, May 31, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

Envisioning Asia: On Location, Travel, and the Cinematic Geography of U.S. Orientalism
University of Michigan Press, 2010
Hardcover, 278 pages, $70

Jeanette Roan, faculty member in Visual and Critical Studies, examines the moment in which the birth of cinema coincided with the beginnings of U.S. expansion overseas. Throughout this period, she proposes, the cinema's function as a form of virtual travel, coupled with its purported "authenticity," served to advance America's shifting interests in Asia. Its ability to fulfill this imperial role depended, however, not only on the cinematic representations themselves but also on the marketing of the films' production histories and, in particular, their use of Asian locations.

Also, by focusing on the material practices involved in shooting films on location—the actual travels, negotiations, and labor of filmmaking—Roan moves beyond formal analysis to produce a richly detailed history of American interests, attitudes, and cultural practices during the first half of the 20th century.

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Posted on Monday, May 30, 2011 by Jim Norrena

The following students presented their work at the 2011 Visual Studies Spring Symposium:

Jennifer Byer
"Squeezed Out, Cast-Off: The Art of Mika Rottenberg"

Eve Letendre
"Lynch’s L’amour fou: Loss, Longing, and Los Angeles"

Natalie McBride
"Almost Where?: Race, Gender and the Disney Princess"

Eden Phair
"Art Historical Angst: Pop Art and Postmodern Irony in Gregg Araki’s Nowhere"

Susan Y. Sherpa
"Vanessa Beecroft in Black and White"

Christopher Wagner

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Posted on Thursday, April 14, 2011 by Jim Norrena

Designers: CCA students Daniel Castro and Jake Collin

On Saturday, April 16, California College of the Arts is proud to present 24/7 2011: The State of the Art in DIY Video a one-day summit presented by the Visual Studies Program. The event is dedicated to the world of video-making practices and digital visual culture and will offer a series of workshops, panels, screenings, and discussions related to the emerging trends and techniques from the DIY video scene.

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Posted on Monday, March 21, 2011 by Jim Norrena

Join us at the many events scheduled to celebrate CCA's 2011 graduating class

Note: This page showcases the wide selection of end-of-year events CCA hosted in 2011. Events listed here are for illustrative purposes only; all events have passed.

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Posted on Wednesday, March 2, 2011 by Jim Norrena

Performance artists Cecelia Cooper, Tina Takemoto, and Keith Hennessy

California College of the Arts prides itself in the myriad forms of artistic expression that can be witnessed on any given day at either the Oakland or San Francisco campuses. One such form of visual art is performance art, which offers a dynamic means of expression, one that often has at its core a political statement or reaction.

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Posted on Sunday, June 20, 2010 by Jim Norrena

(l to r) CCA chairs Julian Carter, Melinda L. de Jesús, and Tirza Latimer at the diversity conference [photo: Jim Norrena]

The “Doing ‘Diversity’: Making It or Faking It?” conference was the first-of-its-kind, all-day planning and discussion meeting devoted specifically to the issues of diversity representation and celebration here at California College of the Arts. The discussion panels laid the groundwork for the college to ratchet up its commitment to fostering greater diversity at CCA.

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