Wattis Institute News

Posted on Monday, June 18, 2018 by Lindsey DeVries

Adam Linder, Choreographic Service No.2: Some Proximity, 2014, duration variable, two dancers and a writer. Pictured at Sydney Biennial.

The Wattis Institute launches its 20th anniversary year with the exhibition Adam Linder: Full Service, a survey exhibition of five choreographic works by Adam Linder (b. 1983, Sydney, Australia; lives and works in Los Angeles). The exhibition is on view at the Wattis Institute from September 8 through September 29, 2018, with performances taking place all day, every day, during open hours. A precise schedule appears below.

Posted on Monday, June 18, 2018 by Lindsey DeVries

Video documentation of NIC Kay’s pushit!! [exercise 1 in getting well soon], Judson Memorial Church, 2017.

CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts is proud to present Susanne Kriemann: Canopy, canopy—the first U.S.

Posted on Tuesday, April 24, 2018 by Lindsey DeVries

James Voorhies to chair CCA’s Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice.

Curator and art historian James Voorhies, CCA’s current dean of Fine Arts, will fully assume the role of chair of the school’s Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice (CURP) on August 1, 2018. Voorhies has served as acting chair of CURP since the untimely passing of the program’s former chair, curator, and educator Leigh Markopoulos in February 2017. 

Posted on Thursday, August 31, 2017 by Chris Bliss

Harun Farocki, ‘Deep Play’ (video still), 2007

Source: KQED Arts

Mechanisms

In these parts, art and technology get paired up on the regular, reinforcing the false binary the very words have come to represent. On art’s side: artists, affordable housing, the city’s creative soul. And for technology: tech workers, the housing crisis, venture capitalism run rampant. But Wattis director Anthony Huberman has managed to turn this old and tired juxtaposition into an exhibition that looks at technology not as a local industry, but as a group of machines — objects, devices, systems and infrastructure.

Posted on Monday, July 17, 2017 by Chris Bliss

Candy Jernigan, Untitled (vessels) , c. 1990-1

Continuing to introduce important artists to Bay Area audiences, CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts presents Patrick Jackson: KNOW YER CITY, a commissioned mixed-media installation by the Los Angeles–based artist; and Candy Jernigan: A Couple of Pencils and Some Paper, an exhibition focusing on the late artist’s drawings and works on paper. The two concurrent solo exhibitions are free, open to the public, and on view June 1 through July 29, 2017.

Posted on Tuesday, May 16, 2017 by Laura Braun

Underneath everything, there’s dirt. Most of the time, we regulate and contain it. We cover it up with floors, roads, buildings, even entire cities. When it spills, we sweep it up—it’s as if we were hiding or repressing it.

Visit source »

Posted on Tuesday, May 9, 2017 by Laura Braun

AMBOY, a film originally produced by Frances Scholz and Mark von Schlegell for an exhibition at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco, is described by the artists behind it as a horror-documentary hybrid. This version, curated specifically for the Kitchen, will include live music and performance elements . Set mainly in Los Angeles, it follows an artist who is trying to shoot a documentary about Amboy, who, the film tells us, was also an artist.

Posted on Thursday, April 27, 2017 by Laura Kenney

Patrick Jackson, Untitled, 2017; courtesy of the artist and Ghebaly Gallery

CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts will present Patrick Jackson: KNOW YER CITY, a commissioned mixed-media installation by the Los Angeles–based artist; and Candy Jernigan: A Couple of Pencils and Some Paperan exhibition focusing on the late artist’s drawings and works on paper. The two concurrent solo exhibitions are free, open to the public, and on view June 1 through July 29, 2017.

Posted on Wednesday, April 5, 2017 by Laura Braun

In many ways, the relationship with Bernstein was precisely what the elder McCarthy had in mind in 2007 when he brought the idea of a new style of gallery to his daughter, a graduate of Bank Street College in New York in museum education. According to Mara McCarthy, her father was deeply engaged in exploring his own mentors and influences in preparation for “Paul McCarthy’s Low Life Slow Life,” a two-part exhibition that first opened in 2008 at CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco.

Posted on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 by Laura Braun

Questions about how humans conceive of time underpinned Japanese artist Yuki Kimura’s CCA Wattis exhibition, her first solo show in the United States. The longwinded title, “Inhuman Transformation of New Year’s Decoration, Obsolete Conception or 2,” belied the sparse installation, which consisted of four artworks given ample breathing room in the large venue, a converted garage.

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