Wattis Institute News

Posted on Wednesday, July 1, 2015 by Laura Braun

SOLO EXHIBITION:
More Heat Than Light
Sam Lewitt
September 10–November 21, 2015

Curated by Anthony Huberman

San Francisco, Calif., June 22, 2015—The CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts is pleased to present More Heat Than Light, an exhibition of new work by New York–based artist Sam Lewitt (b. 1981, Los Angeles), September 10 through November 21, 2015. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

Posted on Wednesday, July 1, 2015 by Laura Braun

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
EXHIBITION:
Amboy
Frances Scholz & Mark von Schlegell
September 10–November 21, 2015

Curated by Jamie Stevens

San Francisco, Calif., July 1, 2015—The CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco will present the premiere of a new film project by Cologne-based artists Frances Scholz (b. 1962, Washington, DC) and Mark von Schlegell (b. 1967, New York), September 10–November 21. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

Posted on Tuesday, June 30, 2015 by Laura Braun

New York artist Julia Heyward utilises language as a central tie in a career that spans video, performance, music, installation, photography and collage. Named after her 1979 video, her solo exhibition Conscious Knocks Unconscious at the Wattis Institute in San Francisco explores her multidisciplinary output between 1971–84. Heyward, who at the time went under the moniker Duka Delight, was involved in New York City’s thriving downtown scene.

Posted on Friday, June 26, 2015 by Laura Braun

Jessica Silverman opened her first art gallery while still a curatorial student at the California College of the Arts. Now she's one the brightest stars on the San Francisco art scene.

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Posted on Monday, June 15, 2015 by Laura Braun

SOLO EXHIBITION: en, set K.r.m.

Mooney June 25–August 1, 2015

 
Curated by Anthony Huberman
 

Posted on Monday, June 15, 2015 by Laura Braun

There is a slow buzz of satire throughout Josephine Pryde’s solo exhibition at the Wattis Institute of Contemporary Arts. Rather than attempting to take the work in as a whole, each photograph requires a lingering study, one by one, in order to notice the humor gurgling to the surface, lest the works be easily dismissed as diaristic. What better way to do this than to ride on a tiny freight-train! Seemingly a gimmick at first, this wholly necessary activity is offered up for viewers: ride a little train to view the photos alongside the track.

Posted on Wednesday, May 27, 2015 by Laura Braun

“Who needs bondage? Isolation will do.” Julia Heyward (also known as Duka Delight) is a master at talking dirty. Her words are seductive, to be sure, but more so unctuous and often defiled. In performances and videos made between 1971 and 1984—the purview of her first monographic survey, curated by Jamie Stevens—she lends an incantatory cadence to skeins of metonymy, rhyme, and alliteration. Buoyed by her southern drawl, language revels in its own slipperiness, a fish the artist is quick to gut.

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Posted on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 by Laura Braun

Just a week before multimedia performer and video artist Joan Jonas received an honorary doctorate from the California College of the Arts, New York Times art critic Roberta Smith called Jonas’ installation at the Venice Biennale, “They Come to Us Without a Word,” “triumphal ... one of the best solo shows to represent the United States at the biennale in over a decade ... an effortless combination of maturity and freshness.”

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Posted on Monday, May 11, 2015 by Laura Braun

We offer a haute welcome to Maison Margiela, which recently celebrated the grand opening of its San Francisco boutique at 134 Maiden Lane. Hosted by Sabrina Buell, Yves Béhar, Alicia Engstrom and Hosain Rahman in honor of the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts at California College of the Arts, the evening event drew Willie Brown, Sonya Molodetskaya, Norman Stone, Jessica Silverman, Maca Huneeus, Antonio Huneeus, Sarah Somberg, Brad Somberg, Lana Adair, Mary Beth Shimmon, Sabrina Buell, Joel Goodrich, Clara Shayevich and more.

Posted on Thursday, May 7, 2015 by Laura Braun

In her photographs, Josephine Pryde frequently stages determinedly pitched, inscrutable parodies of selfhood. For her first show in a US institution, she presents a series of roughly twenty newly created images of women’s hands in close encounters with their own bodies, as well as with touch screens and touch lamps. Held in suspended states of discovery, these hands are living it up, footloose and perhaps in the midst of one of the “lapses” of self-awareness suggested by the show’s title.

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