Wattis Institute News

Posted on Tuesday, March 5, 2013 by Allison Byers

Jens Hoffmann, when he was director of the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco, took a sizable gamble by commissioning 12 acclaimed photographers, including Larry Clark, Katy Grannan, Catherine Opie, Martha Rosler, Collier Schorr, Stephen Shore and Alec Soth, to document the mood of the nation in 2011.

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Posted on Monday, March 4, 2013 by Allison Byers

“Painting Between the Lines,” organized by the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco and curated by Jens Hoffmann, takes a calculated risk. What a reader sees while reading is idiosyncratic. Imagination rushes in to fill in the blanks. That’s one of the delicious things about books, and the tables set by authors here, such as Albert Camus, Marcel Proust, and Fyodor Dostoevsky, beckon us to a sumptuous meal.

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Posted on Monday, January 14, 2013 by Allison Byers

Fifteen years ago, CCA's Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts opened its doors to the public as an active center for showcasing modern, cutting-edge work meant to spark discussion and interaction. This month, the gallery space makes its big move from the city's Design District to a more prime location in Potrero Hill. Designed by architect Mark Jensen, the large, gymnasium-sized space features galleries and event space.

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Posted on Sunday, January 6, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Americana: 50 States, 50 Months, 50 Exhibitions
CCA Wattis Institute, 2012
Hardcover, 240 pages, $25

This catalogue, designed by Jon Sueda (Graphic Design faculty), documents a five-year-long series of exhibitions that examined the 50 American states, featuring artworks, historical artifacts, curiosities, and aspects of the overlooked and the little-known. The series was coorganized by Wattis Institute director Jens Hoffmann and CCA's Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice.

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Posted on Thursday, January 3, 2013 by Allison Byers

The Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts at the California College of the Arts is due to re-open in the new year with a new exhibition and event space.

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Posted on Tuesday, December 18, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

The Way Beyond Art 2: Wide White Space
CCA Wattis Institute, 2012
Paperback, 146 pages, $17

To see more pages from the book visit the official Wide White Space website.

Edited and designed by Jon Sueda (Graphic Design faculty), this book investigates graphic design's evolving relationship with the practice of exhibition making as it intersects with the visual arts and the work of both artists and curators. It features notable designs (in full color) and essays by Project Projects and CCA faculty members Rachel Berger, Eric Heiman, Brett MacFadden, Emily McVarish, and Scott Thorpe.

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Posted on Monday, December 17, 2012 by Allison Byers

The Way Beyond Art 4: Infinite Screens
January 22, 2013–February 16, 2013

Claire Fontaine: Redemptions
January 22, 2013–March 30, 2013

The CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts will begin the year 2013 in a new exhibition space. It has departed from its current location on Eighth Street in San Francisco and is moving its Kent and Vicki Logan Galleries to a building recently acquired by CCA at 360 Kansas Street (between 16th and 17th Streets). The building, newly renovated by the architect Mark Jensen, contains galleries as well as event space. The event space will be used by the Wattis and CCA.

The first shows in the new galleries, opening January 22, 2013, are Claire Fontaine: Redemptions; and an exhibition of Werner Herzog's Hearsay of the Soul, titled The Way Beyond Art 4: Infinite Screens.

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Posted on Monday, December 17, 2012 by Allison Byers

The CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, California College of the Arts, San Francisco, is getting a new exhibition space for the holidays. The Institute's Kent and Vicki Logan Galleries are moving from San Francisco's Eighth Street to a newly acquired building on Kansas Street.

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Posted on Monday, November 5, 2012 by Rachel Walther

Zarouhie Abdalian (MFA 2010) maintains quite the hectic travel schedule. This fall she made a trip to Bergen, Norway, to participate in the Kunstindustrimuseum's Material Information exhibition, and afterward she headed to the 9th Shanghai Biennial as a participant in the San Francisco pavilion. She's exhibited work and created site-specific installations throughout the United States and eight other countries; right now you can see one of her works, The fall without the fruit, at the CCA Wattis Institute's When Attitudes Became Form Become Attitudes exhibition, on view through December 1, 2012.

Abdalian's work has evolved dramatically since her years as an undergraduate at Tulane University, where she focused on painting and printmaking. While at CCA she developed an entirely new way of working that is sculptural, and profoundly site specific. A new piece doesn't begin until she researches the place where it will be located. Visually and historically, her installations engage in dialogue with their viewers and -- ideally -- disrupt their typical interaction with a particular place.

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Posted on Wednesday, August 8, 2012 by Allison Byers

San Francisco, Calif., August 8, 2012--The CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts will present the exhibition When Attitudes Became Form Become Attitudes: A Restoration / A Remake / A Rejuvenation / A Rebellion (script and display by Jens Hoffmann, based upon an original exhibition by Harald Szeemann) September 13 through December 1, 2012, in the Wattis Institute galleries, located on the San Francisco campus of California College of the Arts. The exhibition is free and open to the public, with an opening reception on Thursday, September 13, from 7-9 p.m.

The exhibition is a sequel to, and reevaluation of, the legendary 1969 exhibition When Attitudes Become Form, curated by Harald Szeemann at the Kunsthalle Bern in Switzerland. The new show brings together 82 international contemporary artists who follow, in various ways, the legacy of Szeemann’s iconic exhibition. The artists will present both existing and newly commissioned works. The show will also bring together archival material, floor plans, and installation images from the 1969 show. This new exhibition does not make a distinction between what is past and what is present, but rather considers When Attitudes Become Form as a living past.

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