Writing News

Posted on Monday, January 5, 2015 by Laura Braun

Tom Barbash: Wrote the novel “The Last Good Chance” and nonfiction book “On Top of the World: Cantor Fitzgerald, Howard Lutnick, & 9/11: A Story of Loss & Renewal.” Teaches at California College of the Arts.

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Posted on Wednesday, December 10, 2014 by Laura Braun

In his first collection, Stay Up With Me (Simon and Schuster £12.99), Tom Barbash finds radiance among the wreckage with tales of love, confusion and estrangement. A charming writer, Barbash draws the reader in with classic American craftsmanship. Even when they break your heart, you want to stay up with these New York stories.

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Posted on Monday, December 8, 2014 by Laura Braun

Mary Behm-Steinberg Hugh Behm-Steinberg is a former Wallace Stegner Fellow and the recipient of an NEA fellowship. His books include The Opposite of Work (JackLeg Press) and Shy Green Fields (No Tell Books), as well as several chapbooks including Sorcery (Dusie Chapbook Kollektiv) and Good Morning! (Deconstructed Artichoke Press).

Posted on Friday, December 5, 2014 by Jim Norrena

The Center for Art & Public Life (The Center) and the MBA in Design Strategy program, both at California College of the Arts, last month co-organized TechRaking 7, an annual hackathon series put on by The Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR), which focused on the intersection of journalism and design.

TechRaking 7, the first within the series to work exclusively with college students (and CCA as its official partner), had CIR CEO Joaquín Alvarado reaching out to CCA to pose the question: How can we rethink human interaction around the news within our communities?

CIR enlisted colleagues from two of its local media partners -- Bruce Koon of KQED and Martin Reynolds of the Bay Area News Group (BANG) -- to challenge CCA students with some of their toughest community-engagement issues. For example, how might:

CIR create new ways for people to communicate about the role of guns in their neighborhoods?
BANG offer a more participatory model that empowers residents to share overlooked topics?
KQED develop cross-regional tools to communicate better the personal effects of the growing technology industry?

Far be it for anyone at CCA to turn away a challenge, thought leaders at The Center decided to enlist the help of CCA students -- working in small teams representing a wide range of disciplines -- to collectively come up with innovative solutions that could encourage greater public participation in today's changing news gathering and distribution policies and procedures.

In short, TechRaking 7 challenged students to give the concept of the traditional newsstand a much-needed facelift.

Posted on Wednesday, September 17, 2014 by Jim Norrena

Gloria Frym, MFA Writing interim chair

MFA Program in Writing faculty member and interim chair Gloria Frym will be interviewed Sunday, September 21, on Poet as Radio, an online show aired weekly on KUSF (90.3 FM) San Francisco community radio.

Frym will discuss her forthcoming book, The True Patriot (Spuyten Duyvil, 2014), for an hour beginning at 11:30 a.m. (Pacific Standard Time).

Poet as Radio features the voice of local and national writers.  View the archive of podcasts »

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Posted on Monday, July 14, 2014 by Laura Braun

Shebooks' sweet spot is short memoir, balanced with fiction and journalism. Oakland travel writer and author Faith Adiele, who teaches writing at California College of the Arts and the Grotto, where she's a member, published her funny, biting cross-cultural take on dealing with her fibroids, "The Nigerian-Nordic Girl's Guide to Lady Problems," in December.

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Posted on Friday, June 20, 2014 by Jim Norrena

Scott Griffin presents the 2014 Griffin Poetry Prize to Brenda Hillman (l) and Anne Carson

Esteemed poets Anne Carson and Brenda Hillman have two things in common: Each has been a guest lecturer at California College of the Arts (Carson visited last April as part of the college's Graduate Studies Lecture Series; Hillman presented in 2007 as part of the

Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Star 82 Review 2.1 and 2.2
CreateSpace, 2014
Paperback and online, $11.95
Issue 2.1 print / online
Issue 2.2 print
/ online

Star 82 Review is an art and literature magazine founded and edited by Printmaking faculty member Alisa Golden. Out now: issues 2.1 and 2.2!

“We’ve got color in the spring for issue 2.1, featuring a new poem by the wonderful Joanne Kyger,  photos by Mary Daniel Hobson that look like tattoos, but aren’t, and graffiti photos and stories and poems that revolve around individuality. Layered and worthy of multiple readings, these pieces deal with contradictions and alternate identities.”

Issue 2.1 features CCA alumnus Jønathan Lyons (MFA Writing 2005), who has created an erasure text from two pages of Frankenstein. 

Of issue 2.2, Golden says: “Like rivers, rocks, and beaches, the pieces in the summer issue 2.2 are about surviving, but also show how we take care of one another, how we often judge too quickly, how we discover compassion and hope: this is an eclectic, colorful mix of writing and art, from poems assembled from gravestones to portraits on toast.”

Issue 2.2 features CCA alumna Bonnie S. Kaplan (MFA 1991).

Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Lady Problems
SheBooks, 2014
E-book, free to members

Writing faculty member Faith Adiele wrote this book based on her personal experience as a Nigerian-Nordic-American woman who develops fibroids while in rural Iowa at the Iowa Writers’ W

Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Lost Children of the Far Islands
Knopf Books for Young Readers, 2014
Hardcover, 288 pages, $16.99

This book by alumna Emily Raabe (MFA Writing 2003) tells the story of twins Gustavia and Leomaris, who are utterly surprised one day when their mother becomes mysteriously ill . . . because she's not really human. She's a Folk, one of a group of people who can turn into animals. Gus and Leo are about to turn 11, the age at which the Folk begin to Turn, and they start to notice peculiar things happening to them, like being able to hold their breath under water for long periods of time. Soon they learn they are the last of the Folk, and the only ones who can stop the Dobhar-Chu, the villainous King of the Black Lakes, from escaping his cave prison.

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