Featured News

Posted on Monday, June 8, 2015 by Laura Kenney

Robert Morrison

I’m a local, born and raised in Oakland. Pretty much everyone I grew up with was interested in one of two things: sports or being a rapper. But my interests went in a different direction: art.

I can’t remember a time when I didn’t love Disney films. Seeing The Lion King for the first time, I was infatuated with how realistic and relatable the characters were. I began mimicking my favorite ones on paper, from Simba to SpongeBob, and creating new ones of my own.

Drawing consumed me. I spent all of my time filling pages with character designs and ideas.

Luckily, my parents realized just how passionate I was and put me in all kinds of art and animation programs. Every summer, I had something to do.

Posted on Tuesday, June 2, 2015 by Laura Braun

The very idea of books’ staying power is what drew alum, adjunct professor, and artist Josh Greene (MFA Sculpture 2001) to found Read by Famous. Since 2012, the project has persuaded luminaries in various fields to turn over books from their personal collections in order to raise money for literary-focused nonprofits.

Operating under the tagline “From Their Hands to Yours,” Read by Famous has already racked up an impressive library ranging in books that belonged to everyone from comedian Jimmy Kimmel to actor Bill Paxton to fellow artist and alum Hank Willis Thomas. Greene asks that the books not just be a copy, but rather the copy that the donor actually read.

Posted on Monday, May 4, 2015 by Laura Kenney

Ming & Khen Soh pose with Ming's 32-pound king salmon

The following exchange between Wai Khen Soh and Wai Ming Soh -- twin brothers and each an Illustration major -- appears in the spring 2015 edition of Glance, the college magazine, as part of the How We Got Here series.

__________________________________

Ming: I started thinking about my next course of action in life while I was serving my mandatory service in the Singapore Armed Forces. I had taken a diploma in digital media design in a polytechnic (which is like American community college) prior to my enlistment.

I asked myself: Shall I embark on work, or further my studies? Whatever path I pursued, I wanted to do the same thing as my twin brother, Khen, as it would be cool to see a pair of twins in the same profession.

Khen: It’s nice seeing brothers face tribulations side by side, especially when they have the same faces! Like most twins, we are always tearing at each other’s throats, only to give the other a friendly pat on the back when the going gets tough.

Also like most twins, we have similar interests. Drawing and creating stories are passions going way back to our childhood. It helped that our parents were encouraging.

I went to a polytechnic, too, and took a diploma in graphic design, and while the education was invaluable, I felt more interested in drawing and painting narratives. So we decided to take an undergraduate program in illustration together.

Posted on Friday, May 1, 2015 by Laura Kenney

CCA's Center for Art and Public Life has awarded IMPACT Social Entrepreneurship Awards to three student-led projects aimed at solving real-world social needs within specific communities.

During the spring semester, six interdisciplinary student teams competed for three $10,000 grants to develop and actualize a socially innovative project. The IMPACT program encourages students across all disciplines to facilitate social change by applying their creative skills and implement solutions collaboratively with community partners.

The awards program supports the mission of The Center for Art and Public Life with the belief that community engagement is the cornerstone of a practice focused on changing the world.

Posted on Monday, April 27, 2015 by Allison Byers

Artist Heather Johnson biked from New Jersey to Joshua Tree and back.

CCA alumna Heather Johnson’s (MFA 2001) artist residency with BoxoHOUSE, one of the newer residency programs in Joshua Tree, California, provided her with a unique opportunity -- an ambitious motorcycle journey and visual art project called In Search of the Frightening and Beautiful -- which has forever changed her life’s trajectory and art practice.

About the BoxoHOUSE Artist Residency

Johnson began the BoxoHOUSE artist residency, conceived and directed by former Judd Foundation deputy director, Bernard Leibov, in 2012. The residency targets artists who work across diverse media and prioritizes those who are exploring issues of site, community, and the environment.

"Heather’s practice is composed primarily of creating very detailed handmade embroideries that resemble highly defined drawings," explains Leibov on the BoxoHOUSE website. "She layers the embroideries so that the base imagery deals with the experience of the project and the upper layers portray mechanical drawings related to the subject matter.

"In the works inspired by this latest project, the under layer consists of a series of topographical and navigation maps that capture the experience of being on the road with its ups and downs and twists and turns. The upper layer is made up of technical drawings of her motorcycle and of its constituent parts.

"Heather considers the bike to be an extension of herself – they are as one when on the road – and the parts to be like her body parts."

Johnson found the project to be a dream opportunity: “In addition to one month of uninterrupted research and art making, this meant a motorcycle journey across the United States and back -- something I’ve dreamed of since the day I learned to keep a 500 pound hunk of metal upright and moving forward on two wheels.”

Backed by a crowdfunding campaign, Johnson spent April, May, and June of 2013 out on the road and at residency in Joshua Tree, developing In Search of the Frightening and Beautiful.”

Posted on Thursday, April 16, 2015 by Brenda Tucker

Josephine Pryde

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

SOLO EXHIBITION:

Lapses in Thinking by the Person I Am

Josephine Pryde

May 5–August 1, 2015

Curated by Jamie Stevens

 

Posted on Wednesday, April 15, 2015 by Chris Bliss

Joan Jonas to receive honorary doctorate from CCA

American artist Joan Jonas will be recognized by California College of the Arts (CCA) with an honorary doctorate degree at its 108th commencement exercises at 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 16, at Nourse Auditorium in San Francisco.

Jonas will deliver the commencement address to more than 400 CCA undergraduates and their families. She will also be honored at a private lunch the day before and participate in the post-commencement reception at the college's San Francisco campus.

About Joan Jonas

A world-renowned pioneer of video and performance art, Joan Jonas is lauded as one of the most important female artists of the 1960s and 1970s and will represent the United States in the 2015 Venice Biennale. She has performed and exhibited her work extensively throughout the world.

In 1994, the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam presented a major retrospective, and another retrospective was organized by the Queens Museum of Art in 2004. She has been included in the Whitney Biennial and in Documentas 5, 6, 8, 11, and 13.

Posted on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 by Jim Norrena

Carl Bass (l), president and CEO of Autodesk; Liam Casey, founder and CEO of PCH

San Francisco, Calif., March 31, 2015 -- The Board of Trustees of California College of the Arts approved two new board members at its March 16, 2015, meeting: Carl Bass, president and CEO of Autodesk, and Liam Casey, founder and CEO of PCH International.

"I'm delighted to welcome Carl and Liam to our Board of Trustees," commented Chair of the Board C. Diane Christensen. "As prominent Bay Area business leaders they embrace the values we hold dear at CCA: creativity and innovation, community engagement, entrepreneurialism, and social and environmental responsibility. I look forward to working with them as we build on CCA's reputation as a global leader in art and design education."

Posted on Thursday, March 26, 2015 by Jim Norrena

Travis McFlynn (l) & Josh Coolidge with "186.282.4 MPS"

CCA alums Travis McFlynn (BFA Ceramics 2013) and Josh Coolidge (BFA Individualized Major 2014) were recently enlisted by Lam Research -- a high-tech engineering-oriented company that is a leading supplier in the semiconductor equipment industry -- to create compelling new artwork that integrates the company’s hardware with an inspirational narrative.

Read about McFlynn's entrepreneurial endeavors »

The innovative company aims to be even more reliant on creative thinking, practices, and culture to stay ahead in an environment of increasingly complex business and technical opportunities.

See Coolidge's art in action at Maker Faire »

Lubab Sheet, who leads innovation, emerging technology strategy, and communications at Lam Research Corporation (LRCX) in Fremont, California, worked with Doug Solomon, former chief technology officer of IDEO and chief strategy officer at both Palm and Apple, to drive Lam’s initiative to incorporate dramatic design changes to reinforce the spirit of creativity.

“I was fortunate to have a lot of freedom to create an innovation lab and draw in some truly creative assets,” said Sheet.

Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2015 by Jim Norrena

On Monday, March 9, members of CCA Architecture staff, faculty, and students came together on the San Francisco campus to discuss why the Black Lives Matter movement is important to its pedagogy -- and beyond -- as well as to the college’s over-arching initiative to promote diversity.

The Black Lives Matter Teach-In began with a standing-room-only presentation in Timken Lecture Hall on the San Francisco campus, and was followed by an organized teach-in held in the back of the Nave.

Among the various breakout groups were meaningful discussions that addressed specific curricular issues and challenges about how architecture as a discipline can address issues related to diversity.

Pages