Featured News

Posted on Friday, May 31, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Liz Ogbu is CCA's "scholar in residence" at the Center for Art and Public Life. She spends about four or five hours a week there; she'd love it to be more, but she's a busy woman.

As often as twice a month she's getting on a plane to attend a design or education conference somewhere around the world -- frequently as an invited speaker. She teaches one course per semester at CCA, which translates to about one day a week. She spends another day every week teaching at Stanford University's famed Institute of Design, better known as "the d.school."

She also runs an independent consultancy that undertakes short- and long-term projects; currently she's working with CCA Architecture faculty member Douglas Burnham on something for PG&E, something else for the Nike Foundation in Nigeria, and a pop-up health clinic project funded by Autodesk.

With another CCA Architecture faculty member, Lisa Findley, she’s writing a chapter on South Africa for a book on different ways of appropriating space globally.

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Posted on Sunday, May 26, 2013 by Jim Norrena

What exactly is the connection between art and science?

CCA's division of humanities and sciences has developed a thoroughly interdisciplinary, two-year thematic curricular project called Exploring Science in the Studio to keep this question on the minds of undergraduates, as they consider courses that satisfy their science requirements.

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Posted on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 by Rachel Walther

Alumna Mary Meyer (Painting 2001) was born and raised in California, but her affinity for the East Coast eventually drew her to New York, and she's never looked back.

Today she owns and operates Mary Meyer Clothing, a storefront shop in the Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn and a wholesale business. She produces and sells clothing of her own design, and also represents several other independent designers.

Her work is a mixture of organic and angular -- natural fabrics with sharp angles and bold shapes.

Meyer credits the success of her company to the enthusiasm for experimentation and innovation fostered during her years at CCA.

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Posted on Thursday, May 16, 2013 by Rachel Walther

Type design is a bit like the music business: There are a few rock stars whose names everyone knows, but there are also a whole bunch of other people you haven't heard of, out there making a living doing what they love.

And CCA is proud to claim many men and women in both categories. Over the years the college has accumulated a real wealth of faculty, students, and alumni who embrace the label "type designer" and have had their letterforms used in some impressively high-profile venues. The college's emphasis on this subfield of graphic design sets it apart from other schools; the Graphic Design Program has maintained a series of courses exclusively devoted to it for more than 20 years now.

And the Bay Area, largely thanks to CCA and its ripple effects, is today a real hotbed of people who are active in the field.

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Posted on Thursday, May 9, 2013 by Allison Byers

Textiles instructor Sasha Duerr (center) and Local Wisdom students (photo: Jim Norrena)

This spring, CCA Fashion Design students addressed questions about garment use while participating in Local Wisdom, an ongoing international fashion research project that examines how we use, share, and engage with our clothes.

Several student projects selected as finalists will be featured in spring 2014 in a participatory symposium and exhibition in London, along with work from six other international design schools.

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Posted on Monday, May 6, 2013 by Allison Byers

Artists and moderators gather for CCA's Painting Expanded Symposium

April 13, 2013, was an especially beautiful Saturday in San Francisco, but more than 100 CCA students, faculty, and members of the public shunned the sunshine to pack CCA’s Timken Lecture Hall for the Painting Expanded symposium, an engaging and inspiring series of discussions about contemporary painting.

Watch Part I on YouTube »
Watch Part II on YouTube »

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Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Bruno Fazzolari (Fine Arts faculty)

I have had my studio in this building, a Victorian in the Mission District of San Francisco, for nearly 20 years. My working area is spread across three rooms of the domestic space.

The smallness of the rooms limits my work to a human scale, something that is important to me. I've always been intrigued by photographs of early Modernist painters working in apartments or sitting rooms cluttered with rugs, doilies, and decorative china.

Abstract painting is a sort of mash-up of the decorative and the sublime, the ordinary and the numinous. Lately I've been formulating perfumes to include with paintings. Perfume is another kind of abstraction. The perfumes are inspired by Blinky Palermo's wall drawings, which were mash-ups of decoration, abstraction, architecture, and being.

Photography by Andria Lo

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Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Zak Timan (Glass 2009)

I make floating sculpture. Using buoyant materials such as cork, blown glass, hollow metal forms, and bird's eggshells, I create compositions that float in clear, oil-filled glass vessels. The compositions' elements are tethered to the vessel bottom with line or chain, suspending them in liquid space.

My Richmond studio is my lab. Inside various testing tanks, including a six-foot-tall glass column, I perform buoyancy and materials experiments. I have tools for glass flameworking and sculpture fabrication, and a computer for 3-D modeling. It’s a little unusual to build glass parts to such precise dimensions, but I enjoy working in this way.

The human parts of my studio are my two remarkable shop-mates: one an LED engineer, and the other a pyrotechnics expert. Both are artists as well. We share a collection of machine and hand tools: a mill, a lathe, a CNC-plasma cutter, and many more.

I love being around such wizards of science, engineering, and light. Every day they are working on something fresh and awe-inspiring.

Photography by Andria Lo

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Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Linda Geary
(Painting/Drawing chair)

My studio is in West Oakland (a few doors down from Zarouhie Abdalian’s). I keep a designated area for my works on paper, collages, and color archive, and the rest of the space is for using oil paint.

The view faces east toward larger loft spaces across the street, along with a few residential rooftops and the Oakland hills beyond. Late in the day, the windows across the street function like a giant mirror or clock that reflects the light, weather, and the sunset.

Photography by Andria Lo

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Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Shawn HibmaCronan (Sculpture and Furniture 2009)

My studio is in a large, charmingly aged industrial space in an old hangar on the Alameda Naval Air Base. The building is at the end of a runway that extends south into the heart of San Francisco Bay.

The industrial capacity of the site, combined with the privacy and central view of the Bay Area, make for an incredible working environment. The material qualities and patina of the space mesh well with my work, which gets done via long days, late nights, loud music, and heavy-duty machinery.

Photography by Andria Lo

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