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Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Shawn HibmaCronan (Sculpture and Furniture 2009)

My studio is in a large, charmingly aged industrial space in an old hangar on the Alameda Naval Air Base. The building is at the end of a runway that extends south into the heart of San Francisco Bay.

The industrial capacity of the site, combined with the privacy and central view of the Bay Area, make for an incredible working environment. The material qualities and patina of the space mesh well with my work, which gets done via long days, late nights, loud music, and heavy-duty machinery.

Photography by Andria Lo

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Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Curtis Arima (Jewelry / Metal Arts 1998, now Jewelry / Metal Arts faculty)

My studio is in the Sawtooth Building in West Berkeley. It is a historic structure, built to house the Kawneer Company factory in 1913, and then later home to the Sealy Mattress Company.

I specialize in ancient jewelry and metalworking practices that are no longer in widespread use in industry because of their time-consuming nature. I want to honor their history and continue their legacy while having a contemporary conversation.

Even though my studio is divided into a retail space and a making space, the "threshold" is transparent; the intent is for people who visit the retail space to be able to see and connect with my processes of making and understand more about what they are looking at and buying.

The studio is definitely an extension of my artistic brain. The aesthetic and functional aspects are totally intertwined. This is also exciting when clients and the public come in, as it allows them access to parts of my artistic process that they'd otherwise never see.

Photography by Andria Lo

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Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Bryson Gill
(Painting/Drawing 2005)

My studio is a large private space in the Mission District of San Francisco. It is broken up into two rooms. The smaller one is for sculpture and prop making. The walls are covered with pine shelving for props and other objects, and, disregarding the mess, it looks more like a store than a studio.

The second and main room I use primarily as a painting studio. It has a large wall of south-facing windows that keep it evenly lit throughout the day. It's an incredible gift to have such great natural working light.

There are so many special things about the space: wood floors, tall ceilings, white walls, windows, roof access, a shop, and proximity to a handful of other artists who share the same floor of the building. There is no place I'd rather be.

Photography by Andria Lo

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Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Zarouhie Abdalian (MFA 2010)

My West Oakland studio is in a bright, sunlit space that I share with five other artists. I've been in this studio since graduating from CCA. Most of my artworks happen at sites, so I use the studio space to do research and test materials.

A large drafting table is the most important component. I've used it for the last decade, and before that, it belonged to my great-great-uncle Sebou Shields, who ran a machine and metal fabrication shop. I like to keep my workspace open and walls empty, but I allow my drafting table to be in a state of flux.

Photography by Andria Lo

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Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Allison Smith (Sculpture chair)

My studio is located in a storefront in downtown Oakland, near project spaces such as Creative Growth and Rock Paper Scissors Collective that combine forms of making, presentation, and exchange. It is conceived as a general store that houses my ongoing project SMITHS, in which I invite various makers to conduct hands-on workshops.

It is also my studio space, office, archive, library, and home. I'm interested in the idea of a general store as a contact zone or space of intimate public exchange that is both material and intellectual. The studio holds my materials, research, remnants of past projects, and works in progress.

Photography by Andria Lo

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Posted on Monday, April 29, 2013 by Jim Norrena

Alumnus Neil Grimmer in Times Square after opening the New York Stock Exchange

Neil Grimmer (BFA Sculpture 1995) epitomizes success.

He’s an accomplished conceptual artist and designer (with past exhibitions at Catharine Clark Gallery, New Langton Arts, Southern Exposure, and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, among others) and today serves as CEO of Plum Inc. (formerly Nest Collective), a pioneer and global provider of premium, nutritious organic baby food with brand name Plum Organics, which Forbes magazine named #19 on its 2013 list of "America's Most Promising Companies."

And he's a dad on a mission. Watch video »

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Posted on Monday, April 29, 2013 by Chris Bliss

AIASF winners Matt Adams (MArch 2011) and Liz Lessig (MArch 2012)

It was a CCA lovefest at the AIA San Francisco Design Awards 2013 on Thursday evening, April 25.

Every year AIASF and the local architectural community gather to celebrate exceptional projects. The gala honors the best of Bay Area architectural design and recognizes achievement in a broad range of architectural work.

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Posted on Wednesday, April 24, 2013 by Rachel Walther

It's been more than 50 years since Rima West (Painting 1960) studied painting in the studios of CCA's Oakland campus. And not a day has gone by since that she hasn't relied on her craft for solace and community. She settled in Carmel after leaving CCA and developed a strong support base in the area, which continues today. She maintains a regular studio practice of painting and drawing, and she teaches dance at the Carmel Foundation.

West was born in the Bronx during the Great Depression, and during her childhood her father had a commercial art studio on Broadway in Manhattan. "Art was always in the house," she remembers. An opportunity to do medical illustration for the National Institute of Health took the family from New York to the Washington DC area, and eventually to California. West's father worked up and down the West Coast, designing exhibits for the state's visitor centers. When West was old enough, she started utilizing her painting and drawing skills to assist on these projects, including designs for a visitor center at Yosemite National Park.

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Posted on Tuesday, April 23, 2013 by Jim Norrena

No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics (Fantagraphics Books, 2013), edited by Justin Hall

The Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards are heralded as the "Oscars of the comics industry." This month CCA's MFA in Comics and Writing and Literature faculty member Justin Hall received an Eisner Award nomination for No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics (Fantagraphics Books, 2013), which he edited.

The publication is nominated in the Best Anthology category. (The publisher, Fantagraphics Books, is the leading publisher with 24 Eisner Award nominations.)

"I'm thrilled to have received an Eisner Award nomination for No Straight Lines," exclaimed Hall. "The Eisners are the most important awards in the American comics industry, and this is a dream come true for me!"

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Posted on Monday, April 22, 2013 by Brenda Tucker

Chris Sollars, SUV Rub, 2008

Chris Sollars, adjunct professor in the First Year Program and the Individualized Major Program at California College of the Arts, is the recipient of a prestigious 2013 Guggenheim Fellowship.

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