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Posted on Tuesday, April 22, 2014 by Zachary Royer Scholz

Curated by Joyce Grimm (MA Curatorial Practice 2006), the exhibition Thresholds of Faith: Four Entries Into the Beyond at San Francisco’s Manresa Gallery features four artists of different faith backgrounds who are all affiliated with CCA.

The artists—Lynn Marie Kirby (Film faculty), Taraneh Hemami (MFA 1991, now Diversity Studies faculty), Ali Naschke-Messing (MFA 2007), and Cara Levine (MFA 2012, now Sculpture faculty)—have each produced evocative individual projects that invite reflection on religious practice and experience within contemporary life.

Housed within the active Catholic parish of San Francisco’s Saint Ignatius Church, Manresa Gallery is a unique project (and a surprising one, to many) that allows local and international contemporary artists to directly explore intersections between art and religion. The resulting exhibitions expand the boundaries of both spiritual and artistic endeavor, and aim to generate far-reaching dialogue within a broad and diverse community.

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Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2014 by Laura Braun

California College of the Arts presents the

2014 MFA THESIS EXHIBITION

May 15–24, 2014

San Francisco, Calif., April 15, 2014 -- California College of the Arts will present its 2014 MFA Thesis Exhibition from Thursday, May 15, through Saturday, May 24, at its San Francisco campus (1111 Eighth Street; open daily, 10 a.m.–7:30 p.m.). There will be an opening reception on Thursday, May 15, from 6–10 p.m. and a special “Stage and Screen” event (featuring works in video and performance) on Saturday, May 24, from 5–7 p.m. The exhibition and accompanying events are all free and open to the public.

The exhibition features works by the 50 MFA students in the graduating class of CCA’s Graduate Program in Fine Arts. It is curated by the writer, critic, and CCA faculty member Glen Helfand. “This year,” Helfand observes, “many of the featured works center on the transforming landscapes of social and technological interaction. In diverse mediums, they are reflections on living with various aspects of overstimulation, social media/mediation, and rapid economic fluctuations.”

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Posted on Wednesday, April 9, 2014 by Chris Bliss

Holland Cotter [Photo: Christopher Myers, courtesy Maryland Institute College of Art]

Holland Cotter, Pulitzer Prize-winning art critic at the New York Times, will be recognized by California College of the Arts (CCA) with an honorary doctorate degree at its 107th commencement exercises on Saturday, May 17, at the Concourse Exhibition Center in San Francisco.

Cotter will deliver the commencement address to 500+ CCA graduates and their families. He will also be honored at a private lunch the day before and participate in the post-commencement reception at the college's San Francisco campus.

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Posted on Monday, March 31, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Norval Gill (Art Education 1937) was born in Stockton in 1914. He began his artistic career during the Great Depression, and today, approaching his second century of life, he is still working and enjoying his craft.

Along the way he was on the Federal Art Project, worked as an illustrator and draftsman at an aircraft company, and has been a teacher, a graphic designer, a painter, a sculptor, and a devoted family man.

Gill is reluctant to differentiate between art for illustration, exhibition, personal enjoyment, and advertising. “I’ve always felt that art is art, and art that is done for a particular purpose does not make it less worthwhile.”

His influences have included the writings and philosophy of the British type designer and sculptor Eric Gill as well as his CCA(C) professor Glenn Wessels, who first exposed him to Lewis Mumford’s book Technics and Civilization and connected him with the Federal Art Project after graduation.

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Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2014 by Laura Braun

Evan Litvak (Interaction Design 2014) is set to graduate from CCA this year, and the idea of delving into the workforce is far from the daunting task most people his age face.

As one of CCA’s inaugural IxD students, Litvak scored an internship with Facebook, which has since secured him a career with the social media giant.

From Fine Arts to Technology

“I came into CCA as a Ceramics major and had been doing fine arts all my life,” Litvak explained. “I had a little interest in computers and technology, but mostly recreationally -- I’d play videogames and surf the Web all the time.

“At the end of my first semester at CCA, I was in the dorms in Oakland and I saw a poster for the first Intro to IxD class ever. It had prompts all over it, with one of them saying, ‘Who’s going to create the future social network?’ and I thought, ‘Why not me?’”

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Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Rivkah Beth Medow (MFA 2003) had become a master at juggling freelance work and personal projects, but motherhood threw her for a loop. Lately, she reports, she’s putting the brakes on working for money and giving more priority to personal projects involving her family.

“I figure, I can always make money, but I don’t have a lot of time to hang out with my kids. I’m committed to creating interesting ways to integrate them into my work.” Her artist-mother role models include Ruth Asawa, whose kids helped bend wire for her sculptures.

One priority project is a photography series featuring the people closest to her. Partly staged and partly candid, the pictures explore relationships, mystery, joy, and tensions within families and friendships. “My portraits function as single-frame documentaries suggesting rich backstories and curious futures.”

 

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Posted on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 by Allison Byers

Team members Kristina Kotlier (MArch 2013) (left) and Raine Paulson Andrews (MArch 2014) (right) with a STAND UP supporter

In spring 2013, three CCA students came together with one common goal: to make a difference with an IMPACT Social Entrepreneurship Award from CCA’s Center for Art and Public Life.

Robert Gomez (MFA and MA Visual and Critical Studies 2013), Raine Paulson Andrews (MArch 2014), and Kristina Kotlier (MArch 2013) were indeed one of three teams who won the award for summer 2013, and the project they carried out, STAND UP with Jamaica, was a major turning point for all of them.

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Posted on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 by Brenda Tucker

Proposed redesign captured attention of Ticketmaster design team!

Matthew Lew’s love of music has turned him into a bit of a design rock star.

In fall 2013, the CCA student (Graphic Design 2015) received a Typography 3 assignment from faculty member David Asari. Lew’s project, a total redesign of the iconic Ticketmaster ticket, got him ink in two leading magazines, Fast Company and Wired, and attention from business leaders and numerous designers, from Facebook to Dropbox, TicPic, Eventbrite, and yes, Jared Smith, the North American president of Ticketmaster.

Lew chose to reconsider Ticketmaster tickets because of his love of concerts. “The design is as old as the cassette tape; they are difficult to read and visually do not give any justice to the experience of live entertainment. It’s the only major ticket service that still prints tickets, and it lacks suitable anti-counterfeiting measures.”

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Posted on Sunday, February 23, 2014 by Jim Norrena

See what you missed, or relive the festivities!

Leah Garchik described it as a "rip-roaring party" in her SFGate post. She was referring to the party held in honor of the 30th anniversary of the Capp Street Project, a residency-and-exhibition program for installation artists supported by the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts at California College of the Arts.

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Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2014 by Simon Hodgson

Filmmaker and CCA alumnus Banker White (MFA 1999) has traveled as far as West Africa in his journey to develop communities and tell stories. But his latest work originated rather closer to home. In his documentary The Genius of Marian, due for theatrical release in April 2014, he follows his mother, Pam, as she deals with the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

“In 2008, seven years after my grandmother passed away after a battle with Alzheimer’s, my mom, Pam, announced that she was going to write a book about her. Marian Williams Steele was her mother and my grandmother. She was a well-known artist. I painted with her my whole childhood.

“As her only grandkid who identifies as an artist, I knew immediately that I was going to be involved. So I started going back home to Massachusetts twice a year to help my mom with the book and to archive Mana’s paintings.”

But what began as a collaborative mother-son book-writing project evolved into something very different, as Pam herself started to experience signs of dementia, and soon was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. “In 2009, I stayed at my parents’ house for three months, just to figure out what was going on,” says White. “It was clear that both my parents needed help. My mom was delusional and had periods of violence. I realized I needed to move home.”

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