Featured News

Posted on Monday, July 27, 2015 by Jim Norrena

Oscar-winning directors Alex Gibney (l) with Rob Epstein at a Film master class

CCA's Cinema Visionaries Lecture Series is a popular public programs lineup of screenings and engaging Q&A sessions with today's most luminary filmmakers.

The lecture series is also part of the undergraduate and graduate Film programs curricula that gives students the invaluable opportunity to learn from the best directors in the industry

  • Alex Gibney (spring 2015): Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015); Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine (2015); The Armstrong Lie (2013); Taxi to the Dark Side (2008)
  • Lisa Cholodenko (spring 2014): The Kids Are All Right (2010); Cavedweller (2004); Laurel Canyon (2002); High Art (1998)
  • Michael Moore (fall 2013): Fahrenheit 9/11 (2004); Sicko (2007); Bowling for Columbine (2002); Roger and Me (1989)
  • Sam Green (spring 2013): The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller (ongoing); Utopia in Four Movements (2010); The Weather Underground (2002)
  • Lucy Walker (spring 2013): The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom (2011); Wasteland (2010)
  • Barbara Hammer (fall 2012): Tender Fictions (1996); Nitrate Kisses (1992); Dyketactics (1974)
  • Werner Herzog (fall 2012): Into the Abyss (2011); Grizzly Man (2005); Fitzcarraldo (1982)
  • John Waters (spring 2012) A Dirty Shame (2004); Serial Mom (1994); Cry-Baby (1990); Hairspray (1988); Polyester (1981); Pink Flamingos (1972)
  • Barry Jenkins (fall 2011): Chlorophyl (2011); Tall Enough (2009); A Young Couple (2009); Medicine for Melancholy (2008)
  • Lourdes Portillo (spring 2011): Night Passages (2013); Al Más Allá (2008); My McQueen (2004); Señorita Extraviada (2001); Las Madres de la Plaza de Mayo (1985)
  • Gus Van Sant (spring 2011): Milk (2008); Good Will Hunting (1997); My Own Private Idaho (1991); Drugstore Cowboy (1989)

The successful lecture series, founded in 2010 with a grant from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, is funded with the generous support of Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein.

Posted on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 by Laura Braun

(l-r) CCA alumni Shannon Shaw, Cody Blanchard, and Ian Amberson

“They’re one of my favorites,” exclaimed filmmaker John Waters as he introduced the band Shannon and the Clams at the sold-out Burger Boogaloo music festival in Oakland on the fourth of July.

See images of John Waters at CCA »

The moment was just the latest career highlight for the Oakland-based trio, who met and formed while attending California College of the Arts.

Posted on Wednesday, July 8, 2015 by Nick Janikian

The Tree of Life mural project (2015)

The Tree of Life (El Árbol de la Vida) is a six-foot-high by 30-foot-long community-based mural project made in May 2015 by currently detained* undocumented immigrant Central American youths and The School of Art and Open Studio of Perquin / Walls of Hope in El Salvador (cofounded by CCA faculty member Claudia Bernardi) and students and faculty from Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Virginia.

* The location is undisclosed to protect the unaccompanied alien children (UACs).

The mural depicts the perilous journey Central American youths face as they cross the United States / Mexico border. It also alludes to the brutality and violence that exists due to trafficking of narcotics.

Posted on Monday, June 29, 2015 by Chris Bliss

CCA joins the 2015 San Francisco Pride Parade

This past weekend (June 26-28) marked the first time California College of the Arts (CCA) participated in the annual San Francisco Pride Parade -- the largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender parade in the nation.

Posted on Monday, June 22, 2015 by Jim Norrena

Illustration faculty member Robert Hunt in his studio

It’s been described as the “Oscar Award of the illustration world,” and this year CCA Illustration faculty member Robert Hunt has the distinguished honor of calling his own the 2015 Society of Illustrators' Hamilton King Award.

Posted on Thursday, June 11, 2015 by Rachel Walther

Steven Miller (Interior Architecture 1992)

Throughout Steven Miller’s (Interior Architecture 1992) professional design career in San Francisco -- spanning more than two decades -- he’s been satisfying his clients with innovative design solutions that are always fresh and unique, with a style that’s distinctly West Coast.

In 2014, his firm’s design was chosen as House Beautiful’s Kitchen of the Year, and his gallery and fabrication space The NWBLK is partnering with a firm from New York that will enable them to expand the scale of their corporate events and gallery openings.

Growing up in the suburbs of Chicago, Miller always had an interest in furniture and interior design. “It’s in my DNA,” he explains. “My grandfather had a furniture store in the 1940s and 1950s on Michigan Avenue in downtown Chicago.”

After an initial stint studying liberal arts at the University of Colorado, Boulder, “I took a semester off and went to New York for eight months. I lived in Manhattan and worked at Sam Flax Art Supply. I went to all the museums and met a lot of people working in the arts, including the cartoonist Gary Larson, who was a regular customer.”

Posted on Thursday, June 11, 2015 by Nick Janikian

Community Arts major Zach Brozman

Congratulations to Community Arts major and poet Zach Ozma (né Brozman), who was awarded an All-College Honors Award (Fine Arts division) as well as won the 2015 annual Student Book Arts Competition (sponsored by the CCA Libraries).

Each spring CCA sponsors the All-College Honors Awards competition, which recognizes outstanding student achievement. Twenty-three scholarship awards are given to students in the BA, BFA, and BArch undergraduate programs and the MA, MBA, MFA, and MArch graduate programs. (The awards are granted during the fall semester.)

Learn more about All-College Honors Awards »

There's No Other Ghost I'd Rather Get Cruised By, a handmade book Ozma has been working on intensely this year, was selected as one of two winning books in the 2015 annual Student Book Arts Competition.

Posted on Monday, June 8, 2015 by Laura Kenney

Robert Morrison

I’m a local, born and raised in Oakland. Pretty much everyone I grew up with was interested in one of two things: sports or being a rapper. But my interests went in a different direction: art.

I can’t remember a time when I didn’t love Disney films. Seeing The Lion King for the first time, I was infatuated with how realistic and relatable the characters were. I began mimicking my favorite ones on paper, from Simba to SpongeBob, and creating new ones of my own.

Drawing consumed me. I spent all of my time filling pages with character designs and ideas.

Luckily, my parents realized just how passionate I was and put me in all kinds of art and animation programs. Every summer, I had something to do.

Posted on Tuesday, June 2, 2015 by Laura Braun

The very idea of books’ staying power is what drew alum, adjunct professor, and artist Josh Greene (MFA Sculpture 2001) to found Read by Famous. Since 2012, the project has persuaded luminaries in various fields to turn over books from their personal collections in order to raise money for literary-focused nonprofits.

Operating under the tagline “From Their Hands to Yours,” Read by Famous has already racked up an impressive library ranging in books that belonged to everyone from comedian Jimmy Kimmel to actor Bill Paxton to fellow artist and alum Hank Willis Thomas. Greene asks that the books not just be a copy, but rather the copy that the donor actually read.

Posted on Monday, May 4, 2015 by Laura Kenney

Ming & Khen Soh pose with Ming's 32-pound king salmon

The following exchange between Wai Khen Soh and Wai Ming Soh -- twin brothers and each an Illustration major -- appears in the spring 2015 edition of Glance, the college magazine, as part of the How We Got Here series.

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Ming: I started thinking about my next course of action in life while I was serving my mandatory service in the Singapore Armed Forces. I had taken a diploma in digital media design in a polytechnic (which is like American community college) prior to my enlistment.

I asked myself: Shall I embark on work, or further my studies? Whatever path I pursued, I wanted to do the same thing as my twin brother, Khen, as it would be cool to see a pair of twins in the same profession.

Khen: It’s nice seeing brothers face tribulations side by side, especially when they have the same faces! Like most twins, we are always tearing at each other’s throats, only to give the other a friendly pat on the back when the going gets tough.

Also like most twins, we have similar interests. Drawing and creating stories are passions going way back to our childhood. It helped that our parents were encouraging.

I went to a polytechnic, too, and took a diploma in graphic design, and while the education was invaluable, I felt more interested in drawing and painting narratives. So we decided to take an undergraduate program in illustration together.

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