Events + Exhibitions

CCA’s interdisciplinary programming offers more than 150 events and exhibitions each year to foster meaningful dialogue among artists and the wider community.

Adam Linder, Full Service, 2018, at Wattis Institute. Choreographic Service No. 2: Some Proximity, 2014, duration variable. Two dancers and one writer: Justin Kennedy, Josh Johnson, and Jonathan P. Watts/ Michele Carlson. Photo by Allie Fora.

Adam Linder, Full Service, 2018, at Wattis Institute. Choreographic Service No. 2: Some Proximity, 2014, duration variable. Two dancers and one writer: Justin Kennedy, Josh Johnson, and Jonathan P. Watts/ Michele Carlson. Photo by Allie Fora.

During the COVID–19 pandemic and resulting campus closures, CCA has reimagined event and exhibition opportunities, answering the question: What can a top-ranked art and design school’s remote programming look like?

We now present our work and investigations through virtual public programs, online exhibitions, satellite websites, and more. These digital experiences from across our academic divisions and galleries, including the acclaimed CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, echo the creative and intellectual curiosity that drive the CCA community—whether we’re on campus or remote.

And you’re invited. Explore thesis work by our graduating students, experience CCA virtual events, travel through online art shows, attend ongoing presentations, watch lectures, and take part in efforts of resiliency and change as a creative activist. This is your chance to learn and make personal connections with art, architecture, design, and writing in a way that wasn’t possible before.

Installation view of What We Offer Is Free, an exhibition honoring Ted Purves at the CCA Hubbell Street Galleries.

Installation view of What We Offer Is Free, an exhibition honoring Ted Purves at the CCA Hubbell Street Galleries.

Watch the future of art and design unfold

Though mostly closed at the moment due to the coronavirus pandemic, each campus gallery is an integral part of the CCA curriculum. Students gain professional skills by mounting exhibitions in these galleries, and Bay Area visitors get to enjoy new work in curated spaces that embrace diverse perspectives and a range of contemporary approaches.

Get inspired, try something new, and share ideas at these live digital experiences happening in real time. All of CCA’s public virtual events and exhibitions are free and open to the public, so you can uniquely engage with urgent cultural topics through the work and ideas of award-winning artists, designers, authors, scholars, and alumni.

Let curiosity be your guide

This year, everything required reconsideration. Our community turned unprecedented heartbreak into an opportunity to invite a wider audience to witness how our students make art that matters and dig deeper into the discussions of inclusivity, justice, and sustainability we’re currently having on our campus on the cloud. These ongoing digital presentations include special websites, recorded videos, and virtual art shows, which you can journey through asynchronously.


Meet the voices of tomorrow

CCA’s graduating student showcases are digital records of work, time capsules of capstone moments, presentations of a community thinking and making during an unexpectedly historic year.

Multi-colored graphic with text overlay Class of 2020 Showcase.

Class of 2020 Showcase

Featuring work by more than 300 graduating students, representing 22 undergraduate majors and 11 graduate programs. Navigate the full showcase experience on Portal, and check out Curator’s Picks of outstanding projects from each academic division.

Multi-colored graphic with text overlay Fall 2020 Showcase.

Fall 2020 Showcase

Featuring work by students graduating in fall 2020 from CCA’s Architecture, Design, Fine Arts, and Humanities + Sciences divisions. Explore the virtual showcase, and enjoy end-of-year experiences reimagined for online presentation.



Exhibitions at CCA

@ccaexhibitions
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Dec. 21, 2020

Ernest Stauhal⁠
Individualized Major⁠
@erneststrauhal

1) What is your major influence at the moment?
My major influence at the moment is Iannis Xenakis.  I'm really fascinated by how he tries to close the walls between architecture and music both visually by his sheet music and audibly with the his unique songs.

2) Hidden information and movement seem to be important themes in your work, where does that come from?
Both of those themes have a lot to do with how jittery I am, inside and outside of the studio.  It's impossible for me to draw straight lines and I get all that nervous energy out by doing runs of screen prints.  Sometimes, I don't even use registration pins when screen printing, to get a frantic, energetic effect in my work.

3) How do you approach atmosphere and color?
I approach atmosphere like a photographer since I shoot a lot of film.  If I want to take a landscape shot, I'll use a small aperture, and if I want to focus closely on something, I'll use a large aperture. However, when it comes to color, some of my friends and classmates are aware of the fact that I love using extremely saturated colors.  When choosing color, I rarely use a color picker and instead manually type in the hex code for the color I want.

4) Is there a particular image or idea you’re obsessed with?
I am absolutely obsessed with the live adaptation Speed Racer movie from 2008.  The colors in that film are so saturated and the visual storytelling in that movie was at least 10 years ahead of its time.  Prior to the movie coming out, I loved watching cartoons of Speed Racer as a child, and I was overjoyed when the movie adapted it perfectly.

5) What next on the horizon for you?
I'm just about to finish up my leave of absence from art school, and I've had so many amazing experiences since the beginning of this year.  Now, I'm just trying to figure out how to describe those experiences through art and music.

6) How is the current environment or state of the world inspiring you at the moment?
The lockdown has given me a lot of time to slow down mentally and physically, and I've spent a lot of that time exploring parks and reserves around Sacramento.

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Dec. 20, 2020

"Co-moderated by CCA faculty Sam Vernon and Graphic Design student Menaja Ganesh, [[email protected]'s second virtual brunch] explored how two performance artists are navigating their art practices under the limitations of COVID-19. During this tumultuous time, many artists have asked themselves, 'How do I adapt my art practice and continue to build exposure for myself in the middle of a pandemic? How can I use objects and materials at hand in my home as a part of my practice?'"⁠

Read Isha Tripathi's response to [email protected] Hosts Virtual Brunch: A Conversation on Performance Art in Times of Social Distance on Rewind Review Respond (link in bio).⁠

#creativecitizensinaction @samevernon

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Dec. 19, 2020

Mary Winona Dora Graham🍂⁠ Part 2 of 2
Individualized Major⁠
@mary.graham.art⁠
♦️------------------------------♦️⁠
⁠Q: How is the current environment or state of the world inspiring you at the moment?⁠
A: The uprisings this summer reminded me of the lessons I'd been taught as a child, ancestral knowledge. It's the radicality of generosity, of inclusion, of education, and the radicality of these tenants when operationalized on a communal scale.⁠
Coupled with the pandemic, it creates a state of the world which yearns for healing, for growth, and for love, and one which is transforming. This state is very inspiring.

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Dec. 19, 2020

Mary Winona Dora Graham🍂⁠ Part 1 of 2!
Individualized Major⁠
@mary.graham.art⁠
♦️------------------------------♦️⁠
Q: Is there a particular image or idea you're obsessed with that inherently inspires your work?⁠
A: I'm always inspired by the stories my father tells about our relatives. Because so many of them passed away before I was born, I never got the chance to meet them in person. As of now, I feel as though much of my artwork is about trying to connect with them spiritually. I'm trying to express a generational / ancestral love.⁠

Find what’s next in our calendar of exhibitions and events

View schedule